environment

  For more than a decade, Kentucky House Rep. Jim Gooch has denied the existence of human-driven climate change.

ohio river
John Minchillo / AP

The Hollywood movie Dark Waters made a splash in the conversation about pollutants in our waters. While the film has local connections - because the main attorney featured in it is from here, and because it was filmed in our region - there are others in our area raising concerns.

parkersburg west virginia
Lexi Browning/100 Days in Appalachia

Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. The last movie he saw in a theater was the remake of True Grit nearly a decade ago. "I'd rather watch squirrels run in the woods" than sit through most of what appears on the big screen, he said.

Courtesy of Washington State University

It's no secret that road salt is not very sustainable. So, states like Ohio are looking for greener alternatives. It is using so-called "BEET HEET," a de-icer made with the vegetable.  A Washington State University professor is proving grape extract and other agricultural waste can be used. Research shows it melts ice faster and causes significantly less damage to concrete and asphalt than traditional methods.

State senators considering one of two bills to ban local bans on plastic bags heard from around 40 opponents, who either came to a committee hearing or sent in written testimony.

Gov. Mike DeWine has released details of his plan to improve water quality in Ohio, starting with preventing toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.  The H2Ohio program will start in the Maumee River watershed near Toledo but he wants to eventually broaden it to rest of the state.

Jackie Hampton has pulled up to a small, self-serve, farm stand. It houses seasonal produce from That Guy’s Farm and floral bouquets from That Girl’s Flowers. She’s here to buy flowers for her daughter’s anniversary.

“Actually this is my first time. I’ve always bought their produce and stuff.” Jackie says looking opening the door to the small, refrigerated building, “ They have beautiful flowers. You don’t see this kind in the stores.”

Jasper Davis stoops to tilt a plastic bottle under a drip of water that's trickling from a crack in the mountainside.

"Tastes better than what the city water does," he says. "Way better."

The spring is innocuous, a mere dribble emerging from a cliff face that was cut out to make room for a four-lane highway. But there's evidence of frequent visitors. A small footbridge has been placed over the muddy ground, and some enterprising soul shoved a rubber tube into the mountain to make filling jugs easier.

U.S. Department of Energy

A former Cold War-era nuclear weapons research site in Miamisburg is now fully in local hands.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Updated: Monday, 1:12 p.m.

On Friday, a green-ish scum began forming in places along the banks of the Ohio River. At the time, the executive director of the Ohio River Valley Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) wasn't concerned, but that changed this weekend. 

little miami bike trail
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

It takes 5,000 to 6,000 volunteer hours annually to maintain the Little Miami State Park bike trail running 50 miles from Newtown to Xenia. The trail turns 40 this year and the Friends of the Little Miami State Park (FLMSP), who volunteer their time to maintain the trail, are looking to celebrate.

newport kentucky
Al Behrman / AP

Climate change: It’s the T-rex chasing the jeep in Jurassic Park and the climate scientist is Jeff Goldblum yelling “must go faster.” It’s omnipresent and ineffable, it’s everywhere and touches everything. It’s a problem so complex that it’s easy to distract ourselves with the efficacy of plastic straw bans and recycling.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

"Al Gore was right."

"There is no Planet B."

"Climate inaction is genocide."

"We stand for all people and all nations."

The Environmental Defense Fund sees Ohio as going in the opposite direction of most other states when it comes to supporting green energy.

Courtesy of Michael Miller

A University of Cincinnati professor is predicting the Arctic Ocean could have no September sea ice if global temperatures continue to rise.

High levels of blue-green algae are currently triggering recreational alerts at 10 lakes in Indiana this summer, according to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

The algae has rarely been toxic to humans in Indiana, but even small amounts of the toxins can be dangerous for pets, said Cyndi Wagner with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

“Even in those small amounts, if a dog drinks enough of the water they could succumb to the effects of the toxin and the toxins — there are four different ones — some of them are neurotoxins and some of them are liver toxins,” Wagner said.

Image by Kirk Fisher from Pixabay

Cincinnati Parks is giving away free trees. The Park Board's Urban Forestry division runs the annual ReLeaf program as an effort to bring residential neighborhoods up to 40% tree canopy coverage.

cincinnati climate change
Pixabay

In a typical year, the Cincinnati region experiences roughly 17 days with a heat index above 90 degrees. The heat index accounts for what it "feels like" outside even if the actual temperature is slightly lower.

point trees
Courtesy of The River City News

The Point/Arc of Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati is constructing a brand new building on Washington Street directly to the north of its longtime home on Pike Street.

As part of its expansion, three trees on Washington Street should come down, executive director Judy Gerding said.

Courtesy of OKI

Cincinnati's climate advisor says the city plans to add 20 electric vehicles and 162 charging stations by the end of 2020.

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