Environment

Environmental News and Features

UPDATE:  Leaders of the Ohio River Paddlefest announced Thursday night that the annual Paddle on the Ohio scheduled for Saturday, June 20 has been canceled due to safety concerns.  The new date is Sunday, August 2.   Over 2,000 paddlers were expected to participate in the annual 8.2 mile paddle from Coney Island to the Cincinnati Public Landing.  

Saturday's Finish Line Festival at Yeatman's Cove also is canceled.

The Roots on the River Music & Outdoor Festival at Coney Island on Friday June 19 is still ON from 4-midnight with  music, SUP lessons, outdoor adventure vendors of all kinds, gear swap, kayak fishing contest, silent auction, etc.  Admission is free with a parking charge.

  Original Post: 

The Ohio River Paddlefest Weekend starts this Thursday with the Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo, followed-up by the Ohio River Outdoor Music Festival and the Ohio River Paddlefest. Saturday morning the U.S. Coast Guard will close the Ohio River to commercial and power boat traffic as paddlers launch more than 1,400 canoes, kayaks and human powered boats for a trip down river.

The Ohio River is one of our greatest resources, the reason Cincinnati is even here in the first place. And each year thousands of recreational boaters enjoy the river. But while being out on the water is a great time, there are dangers involved, especially with the amount of commercial traffic that travels our stretch of the Ohio.

**The rescheduled Global Water Dances event will happen on Saturday, August 2 at 11am along the Serpentine Wall in Cincinnati**

Cincinnati again joins in the Global Water Dances movement to bring awareness of the need for healthy, fresh water.

    

According to the EPA, an estimated 600,000 tons of monitors, 67,000 tons of computer mice and keyboards and 20,000 tons of mobile devices are disposed of each year in the United States. Just a small percentage of that and other electronic waste, or e-waste, is recycled. But you can do your part to properly, and safely, recycle your old electronic products.

Provided, SOLARO.org

John Kamanga is the coordinator of the South Rift Association of Land Owners, a land trust in Kenya that works to involve the entire community in all conservation efforts. 

    

The first Earth Day was 45 years ago. And on April 22 every year since then, people around the world celebrate the day by taking some action to improve the environment. Joining us to talk about the progress we’'ve made to create a greener, cleaner, more sustainable environment, worldwide and here in our region, are Cincinnati Nature Center Chief Naturalist and Adult Program Manager Bill Creasey; Brewster Rhoads, executive director of Green Umbrella Regional Sustainability Alliance; and, Scott Beuerlein, Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden horticulturist and chairman of the Taking Root campaign.

The Zoo's Earth Day celebration, “Party for the Planet,” takes place April 23; the 2015 Midwest Regional Sustainability Summit will by held May 1 at the Xavier University Cintas Center, registration is open until April 29. And for recycling anything in Hamilton County, check out the Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District website

Green roofs, living architecture and softscapes

Apr 22, 2015
inhabitat.com

  Long established in Europe, green, or living, roofs are becoming increasingly popular here in the United states, as more people  recognize their value in conserving energy, improving air quality, and managing storm water runoff, along with their aesthetic qualities.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

  Owners of electric vehicles have more opportunities to get a re-charge in Greater Cincinnati with the addition of five new charging stations. Ann Thompson joins us for details. 

 

Michael Bean on the Endangered Species Act

Apr 1, 2015

  Michael Bean has, literally and figuratively, written the book on wildlife conservation law and has directed the wildlife conservation activities of the Environmental Defense Fund since 1977. 

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is presenting its 23rd annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series next month. Since 1993, the series has brought a slate of esteemed naturalists and scientists to Cincinnati to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts. Joining us today with interviews of the speakers taking part in this year’'s lecture series is Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard.

Edible gardens and fruit trees in your landscape

Feb 17, 2015

  Maintaining a garden or landscape takes a lot of time and effort, mulching, weeding and watering, to keep everything healthy and looking good. You’re doing all of that work, why not get a bit more out of it by substituting blueberries, vegetables, herbs, or other edible plants for some of the flowers you typically grow, or maybe add a fruit tree to your yard? Joining us to discuss edible gardening and to answer your questions are apple orchardist Marsha Lindner; Melinda O'Briant Adult Education director at Turner Farm; and, David Koester, Campbell County Horticulture extension agent.

  After spending 20 years as a research biologist with the Florida Marine Research Institute, Dr. Blair Witherington joined the University of Florida'’s Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research where he is in charge of the Disney Animal Kingdom’'s sea turtle conservation effort.

Birdmen - future of conservation

Jan 28, 2015
Provided, Cincinnati Magazine, Jonathan Willis

  

  While spring seems a very long way off, local gardeners are getting ready now to get back outside, doing research, checking out the latest seed and plant offerings and gardening news, and planning what to grow once warmer weather returns.

  

  In 1964, Clyde Peeling opened Reptiland in Allenwood, Pennsylvania and for the last 50 years, has been educating generations of visitors about the importance of reptiles in nature. Thane Maynard of the Cincinnati Zoo recently had the chance to talk with Clyde Peeling about his half-century at Reptiland.

University of Cincinnati  Assistant Professor Steve Matter and three undergraduate students traveled to the Canadian Rocky Mountains to study the effect of climate change on the Rocky Mountain Apollo butterfly. He stopped by our studio to share stories and insights from that research trip with the Cincinnati Zoo's Thane Maynard.

  Do you remember when you were growing up, playing in creeks and walking through the woods? Have you ever shared some of those experiences with your children?

 We all know the environmental importance of trees. And most homeowners realize they have a significant intrinsic worth as well. The right tree in the proper setting can define a landscape and add significantly to a home’'s resale value. This is the perfect time of year to plant or relocate trees, but picking, positioning and planting a tree takes some careful thought and planning.

The Monarch butterfly has been studied universally – from its captivating metamorphosis to its amazing 2,500-mile migration. But within just the past decade, there has been a staggering 97% decrease in the butterfly's population. Today we'll discuss this startling decrease and the Milkweed to Monarchs program that our own Cincinnati Nature Center is undertaking to help reverse the decline. Joining us are Bill Hopple, executive director and Bill Creasey, chief naturalist & adult program manager.

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