FEMA

Several victims of the tornadoes that moved through the Miami Valley on Memorial Day have received notices from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that they were overpaid disaster relief funds.

The agency says a total of six individuals, so far, have received notices of potential overpayment.

It’s been a month since the Memorial Day tornadoes cut a wide path of destruction across the Miami Valley.

Damage assessments continue, but the latest numbers already show roughly 5,700 Montgomery County properties were damaged in the storm. Hundreds more homes and businesses were affected across Mercer and Greene Counties.

It’s still unclear exactly how many residents remain displaced. And, Dayton-area advocates want more people affected by the tornadoes to come forward for FEMA assistance.

Additional Federal Emergency Management Agency disaster recovery centers are expected to open Wednesday in Beavercreek and Celina to assist people in Greene and Mercer Counties affected by the Memorial Day tornadoes. 

Another is expected to open soon in Eastern Ohio this week as well.
 

The centers will be staffed by federal experts from FEMA and the United States Small Business Administration to offer storm survivors assistance with temporary living expenses, uninsured home repairs, and other urgent needs.

Miami Valley officials are only beginning to calculate the longterm impacts of the devastation from last week’s tornado outbreak. Key is an investigation by FEMA to determine whether Ohio is eligible for emergency aid.

Officials caution it’s a complicated process that will take time. To see it in action, WYSO’s April Laissle followed one FEMA team into a particularly hard-hit area of Trotwood.

At the Westbrook Village Apartment Complex, a group of FEMA investigators walk through muddy grass holding clipboards, taking stock of what’s left.

flooded streets in the East End, house in distance
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Time is running out to report flood damage in Hamilton County. Ryan McEwan with Emergency Management said the agency wants reports in by Wednesday so they can turn them over to the state by Friday.

City of Cincinnati

A newspaper report last weekend suggested Cincinnati officials allowed the federal government to quietly decertify a flood levee protecting Lunken Airport and nearby homes and businesses without telling city council or the affected property owners.

But testimony from city officials and documents suggest the process was anything but quiet.  Council's Budget and Finance Committee heard about the Lunken flood levee during a meeting last Tuesday.