gas tax

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

A 23-year-old man shows up in Newport and claims he's Timmothy Pitzen, who disappeared at the age of six in May, 2011 from the Chicago area. DNA test results reveal the hoax. 

Members of the Ohio House and Senate reached a deal to raise the gas tax by 10.5 cents beginning in July. The lawmakers say that will be enough to help Ohio close a funding gap for construction on the state's roads and bridges. 

The deadline for a new state transportation budget with a gas tax hike came and went at midnight – without a new spending plan being signed. Lawmakers are coming back to the Statehouse this week hoping to work it out.

WVXU file

WVXU Senior Political Analyst Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine's proposal for an 18 cent per gallon increase in the gasoline tax to create a fund for fixing Ohio's dilapidated and unsafe highways. But his fellow Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly have balked at DeWine's 18 cents. The House is to to give 10.7 cents; the Senate only six cents. Like his predecessor, John Kasich, DeWine is already having trouble with his party's leadership in the legislature.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he's trying to convey his message to lawmakers that the state is in dire need of more money for construction projects, and that his 18-cent gas tax increase proposal is the way to generate those funds. But the House cut that proposal down to 10.7 cents and Republican Senate leaders say more changes are coming.

Republican Senate leaders released their version of the transportation budget bill, making dozens of changes to what the House passed in HB62, however the gas tax increase went untouched. Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) says it's very likely that will change.

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18 cents gas tax increase was dropped to 10.7 cents by the House. Now the transportation budget is in the Senate, where it’s likely to get changed again.

When asked by reporters whether it's time for the federal government to hike taxes on gas, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine explains why he thinks that's not a good idea.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he's heard local governments' funding complaints and he has plans to help. Speaking in Cincinnati Friday afternoon at the Government Strategies lunchon, the first-term Republican says he knows the last eight years have been tough for counties, townships and municipalities.

There are some big changes in the transportation budget passed by the House compared to the proposal from Gov. Mike DeWine, who has said an 18 cent gas tax hike is needed to maintain and repair Ohio’s roads.

State lawmakers are considering a bill to raise Kentucky’s gas tax by 10 cents per gallon, but the measure has a long way to go and time is running out on this year’s legislative session.

Just hours after Gov. Mike DeWine’s State of the State speech in which he argued for an 18-cent gas tax increase to fund road repair and maintenance, state lawmakers cut his request dramatically.

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent hike in the gas tax is still before state lawmakers. They would have to approve it as part of the transportation budget, which must be signed into law by March 31.

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine has found himself in a tough position right at the start of his administration – having to raise a tax that hits most Ohioans. And Democrats have pounced on him for it.

Gov. Mike DeWine says raising the gas tax from 28-cents a gallon to 46-cents a gallon will help fill a $1 billion construction budget shortfall, but the proposal has led to a debate over how it will impact Ohioans.

The committee reviewing the financial situation facing the Ohio Department of Transportation heard testimony for a second day today – and is expected to release a report recommending funding solutions very soon. It seems likely that an increase in the gas tax will be part of it. The leader of the Ohio House says he’s willing to talk about it.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin visited Northern Kentucky Wednesday to cut the ribbon on a new medical studies building at Northern Kentucky University and answer questions at a community forum in Newport.