guns

William Wood answers the door to his suburban Columbus home with a Glock 19 on his hip. His two toddler-aged children, Daisey and Wesley, peak out from behind his legs.  

The group pushing for expanded background checks on gun sales says the tragic mass shooting in Dayton has galvanized the state and petitioners say it's time for Ohio lawmakers to take this issue of closing the so-called "Gun Show Loophole" seriously. 

After the mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, gun control is again at the forefront of the political conversation.

President Trump has expressed openness to a federal red flag law and for "meaningful" background checks.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

In the wake of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, this past Sunday, Governor Mike DeWine took a dramatic shift Tuesday, unveiling several new proposals to curb gun violence. The move comes after a crowd of mourners chanted "Do something" at the governor during a vigil Sunday night.

A bipartisan group of Kentucky lawmakers has proposed a bill that would allow police or family members to ask a court to temporarily take guns away from people if they present a danger to themselves or others.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has said he wants input from gun rights advocates as he works on his plan to reduce gun violence, but some of Ohio's largest groups seem to be split on his proposal.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is ignoring Democrats' efforts to pressure him into calling the Senate back from recess to vote on gun legislation to expand background checks following back to back mass shootings.

But there is movement among some Republican lawmakers, who are calling for action on some gun control measures.

Gov. Mike DeWine, R-Ohio, is calling for a version of the "red flag" law, expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in response to the mass shooting in Dayton over the weekend that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

mike dewine dayton shooting
John Minchillo / AP

After facing shouts at a vigil Sunday to "do something" following the mass shooting in Dayton, Governor Mike DeWine on Tuesday announced a list of 17 ideas he said will help keep Ohioans safer. One of those ideas proposed was a so-called "red flag" law that DeWine said would allow a court to remove guns from people who pose a threat to themselves or others.

In the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohioans for Gun Safety says now is the time for state lawmakers to expand and strengthen background checks for gun purchases. 

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

As national and local leaders grapple with the nation's raw emotions over the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, the mayor of El Paso, Dee Margo, confirmed that President Trump will visit his city on Wednesday.

dayton shooting
John Minchillo / AP

The president is speaking from the White House about the mass shootings that took place over the weekend in Ohio and Texas. Watch his remarks live.

The speech is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. ET. If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video does not play, please try refreshing the page. 

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton, while some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion and oppose one of the most recent state restrictions on it. 

State officials have approved the petition language that calls on expanded background checks for gun purchases and transfers. This allows the group, Ohioans For Gun Safety, to collect signatures for the initiated statute.

It looks like Ohio voters might get to vote on a proposed law that would expand background checks for firearm sales after all. A previous version of a petition was rejected last month.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council unanimously approved a resolution to address the increase in summer violence at a Thursday meeting.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department wants to increase police presence in crime hot spots in hopes of reducing violent crime.

The bill that would allow Ohioans to carry concealed weapons without requiring training or a permit has passed a House committee. The measure, which is known as “constitutional carry,” has passed in more than a dozen other states.

A gun safety group that wants to convince Ohio lawmakers to require background checks on nearly all gun sales is not giving up on its effort, though Attorney General Dave Yost rejected its first attempt. 

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