Harriet Beecher Stowe

mark twain huckleberry finn
Castle

Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is one of the most-challenged books in America. A library in Concord, Mass., banned the novel just after its 1885 release in the United States, and the book continues to be one of the most controversial books in classrooms and libraries today, with critics citing its racially insensitive language and depictions of African Americans.

Mt. Auburn's Harriet Beecher Stowe House has opened a new educational center. 

Greg Hume

Once the home of influential anti-slavery author Harriet Beecher Stowe, the Stowe House in Walnut Hills is recognized as a site on the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.  Planning is underway for restoration work on the 184-year-old house located at the corner of Martin Luther King Drive and Gilbert Avenue.

Cincinnati’s Harriet Beecher Stowe House is now hosting the exhibit Rethinking Porkopolis, examining our city’s long history with pigs and pork processing. 

pixabay.com

  

There is a reason Cincinnati has adopted the flying pig as its unofficial mascot. It's a  reminder of the city's early days, when the pork processing industry was so vital to the city's local life and economy Cincinnati was known as Porkopolis. 

Friends of Harriet Beecher Stowe House

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1850 short story, “Christmas, or the Good Fairy,” will be staged for the first time Dec. 9 at the writer’s former home in Walnut Hills.

“Christmas, or the Good Fairy” was first printed Dec. 26, 1850, in the National Era, the abolitionist newspaper which also published Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” as a serial. It is set in 1849 in The Bottoms area of Cincinnati, which stretched from the Public Landing north to Sixth Street, and east to Mount Adams.

Cincinnati playwright Trey Tatum and director Bridget Leak adapted her short story into a 30-minute play for their Queen City Flash theater group.