heroin crisis

This story comes from The Ohio Center For Investigative Journalism. Find out about local events focused on solutions to the opioid crisis below.

The most dangerous time for Cincinnati heroin addicts is not a typical party time: 3 p.m. on Wednesdays. For Columbus, it’s 6 p.m. on Thursdays, and in Akron, 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. 

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Health officials in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky recently reported an increase in the number of HIV cases linked to injection drug use in the region. The increase is the result of the continuing heroin crisis, as drug users share needles contaminated with the virus. That's why many health experts advocate for needle exchange programs, such as The Cincinnati Exchange Project (CEP), or the one operated in the Northern Kentucky Health Department's Grant County office.

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Much of the reporting on the heroin crisis is focused on the tragic aspects of the epidemic, leaving people feeling helpless and hopeless without an end in sight. A local organization, the Urban Minority Alcohol & Drug Abuse Outreach Program (UMADAOP), says getting out a message of help and hope is equally as important as telling the story of risk and loss.