history

lower west end
Courtesy of Cincinnati Museum Center

The year 1619 is getting a lot of mentions lately, in large part because of the massive The 1619 Project undertaken by The New York Times. August marks 400 years since slavery began in America.

roger fortin book
Courtesy of Cincinnati Book Publishing

Independence Day typically inspires many Americans to re-examine our nation’s founding principles and their relevance to our current circumstances.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Before taking Ethnic Studies at Walnut Hills High School, Holly Bates wanted to talk about race but didn't feel comfortable because of what she thinks is a lack of knowledge.

Mike Blum / Provided

A Northern Kentucky library will host a safe-opening ceremony Thursday morning.  The hope is it will shine some light on local history. The 19th century safe was owned by the Covington-Cincinnati Bridge Company.

Over 350 artifacts and a mummy dating back more than 3000 years are all part of the exhibit Egypt: The Time of Pharaohs, now on display at the Cincinnati Museum Center

ohio presidents
All Wikimedia Commons

Ohio has been referred to as the "Mother of Presidents." Seven U.S. presidents were born in Ohio: Ulysses Grant, Rutherford Hayes, James Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William Howard Taft and Warren G. Harding. And an eighth, William Henry Harrison, was born in Virginia but lived most of his adult life in Ohio.

let the people see emmett till
Amazon.com

Between 1882 and 1968, the NAACP documented 4,743 lynchings in the United States. All were abhorrent, but none was more socially and politically impactful than the lynching of Emmett Till.

Honoring Martin Luther King Day:

Roberta Schultz reviews the book Lynching and Mob Violence in Ohio, 1772-1938 (Published by McFarland), written by David Meyers and Elise Meyers Walker.

Honoring Martin Luther King Day:

The life of author and abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe is on display on Gilbert Avenue each weekend at the Harriet Beecher Stowe House. Joining our Barbara Gray to talk about the mission of the house and this woman's extraordinary life are Harriet Beecher Stowe House Director Christina Hartleib and Board Member Katherine Gibbons.

How The Great War Changed The Course Of History

Nov 14, 2018
world war one
U.S. Army

The "war to end all wars" began with Austria-Hungary's declaration of war on Serbia on July 28, 1914. The fighting ended when Germany accepted the armistice terms demanded by the Allies, on November 11, 1918. More than 17 million military personnel and civilians died, including 116,000 Americans.

The Cincinnati Observatory.
Keith Allen

The Cincinnati Observatory is known as the "Birthplace of American Astronomy." The nation's oldest public observatory is celebrating its 175th anniversary this month. On November 9, 1843, on four acres of land on what was then known as Mt. Ida, former president John Quincy Adams presided over the dedication of the observatory and the laying of the cornerstone. Following the event, Mt. Ida was renamed Mt. Adams.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Head of the University of Cincinnati's Archives and Rare Books has worked with a ghost for more than 30 years. He brings his unique perspective as he takes WVXU along on a mini-ghost tour.

Kyeland Jackson / WFPL

If you’ve ever wanted to step aboard a ship like the ones used by Christopher Columbus, this is your chance.

nagasaki atomic cloud
Courtesy / U.S. Office for Emergency Management Office of War Information

On August 6, 1945, during World War II, an American B-29 dropped the atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people. Tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure. Three days later, another atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15.

mammoth cave
Jackie Wheet / Mammoth Cave National Park

In 1866, Cincinnati photographer Charles Waldack snapped the nation’s first cave photos. Some say they may be the first in the world. Practical photography had been around less than 30 years, and while success was uncertain, these photos helped put Mammoth Cave—now a UNESCO World Heritage Site—on the map.

How much do you know about Colerain Township? 

camp chase
George C. Campell / Wikimedia Commons

Last Monday, we all stopped to recognize Memorial, or Decoration, Day.

In the process of research for his 2001 book, "Race and Reunion," Yale Historian David Blight stumbled into the story of the first Decoration Day, just weeks after the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox.

Violins Of Hope, Remembering The Holocaust

Jan 4, 2018
Provided

On January 23, the Holocaust & Humanity Center will present Violins of Hope, a community performance featuring nine Holocaust era violins, played by some of Cincinnati's finest musicians.

amazon.com

Imagine what it would be like to be the son or daughter of a dictator, someone most of the world considers a monster, such as Stalin or Pol Pot. What would you do, if you were the child of someone so infamous?

National Archives and Records Administration

 

Seventy-five years ago today, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

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