History

You Know Uncle Tom, But Do You Know Josiah?

May 30, 2018
josiah henson
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center / Provided

Most every American is familiar with the famous anti-slavery novel "Uncle Tom’s Cabin," but few people know about Josiah Henson, the man whose life story inspired author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Enslaved for more than 40 years, Henson eventually escaped to Canada, building a settlement for fellow escapees called Dawn.

Provided. Cincinnati Museum Center

The women's suffrage movement in the United States officially began with the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. In 1855, a National Woman Suffrage Conference was held in Cincinnati. But it took until the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 for women to gain the right to vote.

wright brothers
Carillon Historical Park

In the spring of 1796, three parties pioneered north into unknown wilderness, their Cincinnati home fading behind them. After a 10-day adventure up the Great Miami River — through mysterious, perilous, unknown wilderness — these pioneers reached their destination. The woman believed to be the first off the boat, Catherine Benham Van Cleve Thompson, is now recognized for being the great-great grandmother of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Both Dayton and the Wright brothers are unequivocally tied to the city of Cincinnati. This is how. 

Provided

One of the oldest African-American women's organizations is the Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women's Clubs, established in 1904. The women supported their community by establishing daycares, feeding needy families and awarding scholarships. Then in 1925, the founders purchased a 17 room home in Walnut Hills, built by Cincinnati architect Samuel Hanaford, known for Music Hall and City Hall.

The Role Of Music In The Civil Rights Movement

Feb 13, 2018
Carl Van Vechten Photographs collection at the Library of Congress

This spring, the Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington College is holding a series of talks and musical performances to highlight the power of solidarity and resistance among African-Americans, abolitionists, and Quakers. The programs address the complicated dynamics of white and African-American abolitionists who were entangled in systems of privilege and oppression throughout the 19th century.

The Modern Civil Rights Movement

Jan 15, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Historians cite December 1, 1955 as the beginning of the modern civil rights movement. That was the day Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for refusing to move to the back of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama. But for many, the fight for civil rights was sparked by individual, personal incidents of intolerance, injustice or abuse.

The fascinating story of how African Americans found their way to the Cincinnati suburb of Glendale via the Underground Railroad, and the historic significance of the Eckstein School building there is now recounted in a new book. 

UC Led Team Excavating Griffin Warrior Tomb

Jan 10, 2018
Tina Ross/Courtesy Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati. Color illustration/Ben Gardner, UC Creative Services

Archaeologist Carl William Blegen was on the faculty at the University of Cincinnati from 1927 to 1957. His discoveries at Troy in Turkey and the Palace of Nestor at Pylos in Greece remain two of the 20th century’s most important archaeological discoveries in Greek prehistory.

Violins Of Hope, Remembering The Holocaust

Jan 4, 2018
Provided

On January 23, the Holocaust & Humanity Center will present Violins of Hope, a community performance featuring nine Holocaust era violins, played by some of Cincinnati's finest musicians.

Latonia's History And Efforts To Revitalize

Dec 11, 2017
Arcadia Publishing

The Northern Kentucky neighborhood of Latonia was an independent city until 1909, when it was annexed by the city of Covington. Once known for horse racing, Latonia, like many communities in Greater Cincinnati, has seen its share of ups and downs during its 150 year history.

Cincinnati's long and accomplished broadcast history is being celebrated in a new exhibit at the main branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

Mourning The Creation Of Racial Categories

Dec 4, 2017
Provided/ NKU visual design student Carly Strohmaier

Many scientists today agree that race is a social construct with no biological meaning. Yet we are asked, on everything from school applications to employment forms, to declare our race.

The recently-released documentary "Mourning the Creation of Racial Categories" explores how the practice of categorizing race began in America and what affect it continues to have, on both individuals and society.

America's First Heroin Epidemic A Century Ago

Nov 7, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

The year was 1908 and an Ohio doctor, appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt as the nation's first Opium Commissioner, warned that Americans "have become the greatest drug fiends in the world." If the sentiment seems all too familiar in the grips of our current opioid epidemic, you'll find there are many similarities, and some shocking differences, between current times and a drug crisis that dates all the way back to the Civil War.

Provided

Created in 1944, the Voice of America’s Bethany Relay Station in West Chester served as the voice of freedom around the world for 50 years. Cincinnati broadcasting pioneer Powel Crosley, Jr. called the VOA building’s main concourse “The Temple of Radio.” Decommissioned in 1995, the facility is now home to the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting.

Provided

In 1961, during the Civil Rights Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality recruited volunteers for a series of bus rides. David Fankhauser, a 19-year-old student, boarded the bus to Jackson, Mississippi. There he and the other volunteers faced violence and imprisonment for protesting racial segregation at interstate bus terminals. Fankhauser was a Freedom Rider.

Provided

Centuries ago American Indians constructed vast earthworks stretching for miles through Ohio. Some of these geometric and animal shaped structures were more than 15 feet high and rivaled Stonehenge in their astronomical accuracy. European settlers demolished many of the structures but some spectacular sites remain.

Pixabay

What happens in Vegas started in Newport, Kentucky. The city was known as "America's Playground" from the 1920's to the 1960's, a hotbed for a criminal underworld of casinos, brothels and mobsters. The Sin City of the south didn't last forever. With reform movements, the election of a new sheriff and an FBI raid ordered by U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Newport began to clean up its act.

Greg Hume

Once the home of influential anti-slavery author Harriet Beecher Stowe, the Stowe House in Walnut Hills is recognized as a site on the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.  Planning is underway for restoration work on the 184-year-old house located at the corner of Martin Luther King Drive and Gilbert Avenue.

Grave Robbers Rampant In 19th Century Cincinnati

Aug 1, 2017
Public Domain

An illicit body trade proliferated in 19th century Cincinnati, but this business wasn't in the red-light district, it was in local cemeteries. Medical schools in Ohio and nationwide needed cadavers for study but no laws allowed for body donation. Doctors turned to grave robbers to do the dirty work. Grave robbing was so rampant that inventors created unusual contraptions for protecting the dead. A high-profile case of body snatching finally led to legalized body donation in Ohio.

Man O'War: The Mostest Horse There Ever Was is the title of an exhibit at Lexington, Kentucky's International Museum of the Horse

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