History

Hate Crimes in the Hearltand Premiers

Feb 21, 2014
Provided, hatecrimesheartland.com

  Hate Crimes in the Heartland, a new documentary that explores the 250,000 hate crimes committed in the United States each year through the lens of two hate crimes in Tulsa, Oklahoma, premiers Monday night at the Freedom Center. Emmy Award-winning Film Maker Rachel Lyon discusses her latest documentary. To view a trailer of the film, click here.

Edward Roach is a historian at the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park and author of The Wright Company: From Invention to Industry, which details Orville and Wilbur’s business side of building and selling airplanes. The author talks with our Lloyd Bryant about the post-Kitty Hawk business world of the Wright Brothers.

Negro Leagues Baseball Exhibit

Feb 19, 2014
Provided, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

  In the first half of the 1900s racism and Jim Crow laws kept African-American baseball players from being on the same teams as white players. So in 1920 the Negro National League was formed, soon followed  by other rival Negro Leagues. An exhibit now on display at the Galleries at Sinclair in Dayton, Ohio, Shades of Greatness, is the first collaborative art exhibition inspired by the history of Negro Leagues Baseball.

Provided, Harlow Giles Unger

By Paul Muller, Cincinnati Preservation Association

  The Cincinnati Preservation Association (CPA) works to preserve the historic cultural buildings and sites in Cincinnati. To help celebrate its 50th anniversary, CPS is asking you to help select the 50 top historic buildings and sites that define Cincinnati. Union Terminal?  City Hall? Carew Tower?

Provided

University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

  An estimated 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust. Six million of them were Jews. Of those, more than one million were children. The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education, formed by a group of Holocaust survivors and their families, educates about the Holocaust, remembers its victims and acts on its lessons.

Cincinnati's Irish Heritage

Feb 2, 2014

The Flood of 1937 with Author David Welky

Jan 24, 2014
Provided

  The Ohio River reached its highest point in recorded history, 79.99 feet, on January 26, 1937. Author and University of Central Arkansas Associate Professor David Welky wrote a definitive book on the tragedy, The Thousand Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi disaster of 1937.

New American Indian Education Center in Newtown

Dec 27, 2013

The Cincinnati Museum Center recently opened the new American Indian Education Center in the Village of Newtown. Frank Johnson learns more about this interactive museum featuring rare artifacts from Bob Genheimer, the George Rieveschl Curator of Archeology at the Museum Center.

Breaking the Line, Sam Freedman

Dec 5, 2013
samuelfreedman.com

  Author, Columbia University Professor and New York Times Columnist Samuel G. Freedman is in town to moderate a panel tonight at the Freedom Center, hosted by the Cincinnati Museum Center. Mr. Freedman’s latest book frames black history and the civil rights movement through the lens of college football.

Insight OTR is a project that started out as an honors course at Northern Kentucky University and has developed into an ongoing search for stories about the people, businesses, culture and history of one of Cincinnati’s most iconic neighborhoods.

I met with Cailtin Neely, creator of Insight OTR on the campus of NKU to learn more.

In early 1941, as it became clearer that the Unites States was headed into war, President Franklin Roosevelt created the USO to provide emotional support to troops.

Cincinnati Beer Brewing

Oct 16, 2013
Arcadia Publishing

With dozens of local breweries in operation, Cincinnati was once known as the beer capital of the world. But by the mid-Seventies, only two local breweries remained. Now, thanks to a growing list of craft beer makers and a renewed appreciation of the city’s rich brewing history, Cincinnati is once again becoming known for its beer.

Cincinnati's Boxing Tradition

Oct 16, 2013
Arcadia Publishing

Cincinnati has a tradition of producing winners in the boxing ring, Tim Austin,  Freddie Miller, Aaron Pryor, and most famous, Ezzard Charles, “The Cincinnati Cobra,” who defeated Joe Louis in 1950 to become the Heavyweight Champion of the World.

The Betts House in Cincinnati’s west end has just opened its newest, major exhibition called Bricks, Barrel Vaults, & Beer: The Architectural Legacy of Cincinnati Breweries. With the explosion of new and historic breweries throughout the city, this could not be a timelier exhibit as Dayle Dearduff, interim executive director, tells our Jane Durrell.

October 13 is the date for this year’s Columbia Tusculum Historic Home Tour, and local musician, artist and resident Cindy Matyi joins Lee Hay to share some of the events that will take place during the tour including art exhibits and live music in many of the homes.

collegehilloh.net

Lee Hay spoke with Diana Porter who is the organizer of a bicentennial celebration of College Hill on Saturday, September 21st from 11am-4pm.  The celebration will be a living history event spanning four neighborhoods from Northside to Mt. Healthy, with 9 living history sites focusing on the theme of abolition and the Underground Railroad.

Cincinnati's Historic Cemeteries

Aug 28, 2013
Tana Weingartner/WVXU

    

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati's earliest roots trace back to what is now a cemetery.

Memorial Pioneer Cemetery,  the oldest cemetery in Hamilton County and the second oldest in Ohio, is hard to find even if you're looking for it. It's tucked away, small sign and all, across from Lunken Airport.  That's where Cincinnati Park Board naturalist Michael George is waiting. 

Pages