housing

downtown cincinnati
Michael E. Keating/WVXU

Cincinnati, like many communities across the country, has a lack of affordable housing.  

RENTCafé

The latest sustainability study from RENTCafé finds Cincinnati leads the Buckeye State when it comes to the number of green apartments. Eco-friendly rentals in Cincinnati total 3,600.

over-the-rhine
Michael E. Keating / WVXU

Private development can mean economic opportunity, increased tax revenues and more jobs for local communities. But in many struggling Cincinnati neighborhoods, new developments by private firms have targeted new residents who can afford to pay higher housing costs. More expensive new housing can increase pricing for the entire neighborhood, which can force current lower income residents to be pushed out of the community.

What's The Fate Of Airbnb In Cincinnati?

Nov 21, 2018
over the rhine
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Short-term rentals, including Airbnbs, are popping up all over Cincinnati, particularly in the urban core. For many, they're an asset to the city, boosting the economy and generating jobs and sales tax. But for some neighbors, the growth of Airbnb is unwelcome.

About a decade ago, a housing crisis swept the country. The crash devastated many communities and changed the lives of millions of Americans who experienced foreclosure or simply walked away from homes owing more than they were worth. 

Here’s what we heard from resident's of Miami Township in Montgomery County at the time - neighbors living near vacant and abandoned houses:

"It’s very disrupting. It’s an eyesore."

"It smells like there might be a dead animal in the backyard. Honestly, there’s like a whole bunch of flies and it’s pretty nasty."

Mark Moz / Flickr Creative Commons

A new report shows only two of the 10 most common jobs in Ohio pay enough for a worker to rent a two-bedroom apartment.

The difference between an animal assistant and a pet is an increasing concern for landlords in Ohio and the rest of the country. It was a big part of the discussion of fair-housing law at a conference of hundreds of landlords in Akron this past weekend.

For many poor families in America, eviction is a real and ongoing threat. Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute.

"Eviction isn't just a condition of poverty; it's a cause of poverty," Desmond says. "Eviction is a direct cause of homelessness, but it also is a cause of residential instability, school instability [and] community instability."

Provided

People Working Cooperatively (PWC) strengthens communities by providing professional, critical home repairs, weatherization, modifications, and maintenance services to help residents stay safely in their homes. The organization is holding its annual Repair Affair on Saturday, May 13. Projects to be completed that day may range in complexity from installing handrails and repairing drywall to fixing leaky plumbing and repairing steps. Last year during the event more than 400 volunteers donated more than 2,000 total hours to serve 60 homeowners.

Provided

Joseph House in Over-the-Rhine serves veterans suffering from addiction through treatment and recovery programs designed to promote healthy, sustainable lifestyles and reintegration into the community. Through a variety of programs such as chemical addiction treatment, transitional housing, sober living skills development, relationship counseling and employment assistance, Joseph House helps its clients develop and maintain independence and provides them with the tools to maximize their long-term success.

Provided

The Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency was founded in 1964 to offer services to low-income individuals and families to help lift them out of poverty. 

Pixabay, available for use

Homelessness doesn’t just affect adults – it can affect entire families. 

Wikimedia Commons

 

Families who pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing and medical care. 

Flickr, available for use

Over-the-Rhine has experienced a remarkable transformation during the last decade. It will soon get a new entertainment district that could double the amount of bars and restaurants in the area. The real estate market is one of the most sought after in the city, and the number of affordable housing units have decreased.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A new study of housing inventory in Over-the-Rhine finds the Cincinnati neighborhood has become more economically diverse since 2002, but has lost 73 percent of units available to people in lower income brackets.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Members of Cincinnati Council's Law and Public Safety Committee are promising action to improve the allegedly poor living conditions at a Walnut Hills apartment complex.

The city has filed a lawsuit against the owners of The Alms Hill Apartments on Victory Parkway.  It comes after inspections revealed several issues including mold, roaches, bedbugs and water damage from leaks.

The city issued 29 pages of orders that need correcting. 

Josette Bonner lives in the building and says she doesn't feel safe or healthy there.

December home sales in the Cincinnati area were up from a year ago, but not by much. 

The Cincinnati Area Board of Realtors reports 1,616 sales last month, compared with 1,608 in December 2013.  Northern Kentucky Realtors say their gain was similar: 397 sales in December of 2014, and 388 in December 2013.

However, total sales for 2014 are different for the two sides of the river.  In Ohio, there was a drop in sales of 1.7 percent , while Northern Kentucky sales grew by 1.84 percent.

Realtors from both groups are optimistic though.

Cincinnati Council could vote later this month on an amendment for how it spends federal housing dollars.  The proposal would shift $1.8 million dollars to an affordable housing project in Pendleton.  That plan would rehab 40 units in the neighborhood.  

But at least two council members want to know why this proposal could be funded, while a plan for permanent supportive housing in Avondale still has not received city dollars.  That more than $500,000 request has been pending city review for nearly a year.  

Linda Seiter of Caracole

Oct 5, 2012

Linda Seiter, the executive director of Caracole, which provides housing and other support services for individuals and families living with HIV/AIDS, joins Mark Perzel to talk about their recent relocation to Northside, the services they provide, and the ongoing challenges faced by those with HIV/AIDS, despite the disease no longer being headline news.

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