Indiana

great clips coronavirus
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

COVID-19 has put a halt on industries forcing Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky businesses to change how they operate and, in some cases, temporarily or permanently close doors. The quick shifts in state and federal mandates is causing many in the Tri-State to need unemployment benefits to get them through the pandemic.

General Motors says it's "exploring the feasibility" of building ventilators for the medical supply company Ventec Life Systems at a GM facility in Kokomo, Ind.

Health officials have warned of a dire ventilator shortage as the coronavirus spreads and the number of COVID-19 cases soars.

Eric Holcomb
Michael Conroy / AP

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb has issued a stay-at-home order calling on Indiana residents to stay in their homes unless absolutely necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19. The order begins Wednesday, Mar. 25 and runs through April 7.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

The number of COVID-19 cases locally continues to increase, and that's expected to continue in the coming days.

beshear dewine holcomb
AP

WVXU reporters and its network of member stations are working hard to bring you all the latest information on coronavirus in our region. We will carry presidential and gubernatorial addresses on air and online when possible. 

Centers for Disease and Prevention Control

An increase in patients with mild and moderate respiratory symptoms is increasing the risk of people catching COVID-19 in Dearborn County, Ind.

Eric Holcomb
Michael Conroy / AP

Updated 5:18 p.m.

Health officials have announced the first coronavirus cases in Indiana and Kentucky. 

When President Trump announced Wednesday that Vice President Mike Pence would oversee the government effort to contain the fast-spreading coronavirus, he said the former Indiana governor "has a certain talent for this."

But not everyone agrees.

Pence's public health record, especially while he was governor, is now coming under harsh scrutiny.

Courtesy of Earlham College

Wikipedia is a well-known first stop on the internet when it comes to researching just about anything - except, perhaps, notable women. Not only are 84% to 92% of editors on the site male, but the vast majority of Wikipedia profiles are about men, with fewer than 20% of pages devoted to women.

Five years ago, Indiana experienced one of the nation’s worst HIV outbreaks. Mike Pence was governor then, and he approved a needle exchange to keep the problem from spreading. Now state leaders are debating whether that exchange — and others — can stay open.

Ethan Howard cradled his prized Martin-brand guitar, strumming gently as he sang of happiness he thought he'd never find.

With support from his family and community, the 26-year-old is making his way as a musician after emerging from the hell of addiction, disease and stigma. The former intravenous drug user was among the first of 235 people in the southern Indiana community of Austin, Ind., to be diagnosed in the worst drug-fueled HIV outbreak ever to hit rural America.

The remains of 2,411 fetuses found in Illinois last year after the death of a former abortion provider have been buried, but authorities say they're no closer to knowing why the doctor had been keeping them.

Communities across the Midwest have been devastated by the opioid epidemic. But there's still a lot of misunderstanding about how opioids affect our bodies. A new and unusual museum exhibit is tackling this issue. 

Every summer for the past three years, the phones have been ringing like crazy in the Office of the Indiana State Chemist. Farmers and homeowners were calling, complaining that their soybean fields or tomato plants looked sick, with curled-up leaves. They suspected pesticides from nearby farms — a kind of chemical hit-and-run.

It was up to investigators like Andy Roth to find the true culprit.

Farmers across the Midwest are facing tight profit margins and rising healthcare costs. And that means some hold off getting medical treatment or forgo health insurance altogether. In response, some state farm bureaus are trying to fill that gap by creating their own group health plan.

Everyone retires someday.

It's a fact of life — one that folks usually come to terms with in their mid- to late 60s. Unless, of course, you're running for president. Or Clint Eastwood.

There's one man, though, who makes a whippersnapper like Eastwood look like a novice: Bob Vollmer, who, at 102 years old, is only now considering putting his feet up after nearly six decades at Indiana's Department of Natural Resources.

Courtesy of Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania

It was a bit of a whim. Then a senior in high school, Serena Pisacano was in full college scholarship application mode when she remembered the deadline for applying to be featured on a Girl Scout cookie box. She dashed off her forms and three months later, learned she'd been selected.

Little-Known Facts About The Ethnic Roots Of The Tri-State

Dec 19, 2019
octoberfest
Ctomasetti / Wikimedia Commons

Our discussions of race and ethnic identity are often limited to big, broad groups: black, white, Latino, Asian, American Indian. Now, data compiled by the APM Research Lab allows us to get past those labels and get to know a bit more about our fellow Tri-Staters.

Courtesy of Earlham College

Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana, may only have about 1,000 students, but it's making waves internationally. Senior Summia Tora is a newly announced Rhodes Scholar, making her the second Earlham student to earn the honor in three years.

Back in May, three Indiana judges got into a fight. It was the crescendo of an incident brimming with colorful details: a gaggle of judges drinking the night before a judicial conference, a failed attempt to visit a strip club called the Red Garter, a brawl in the parking lot of an Indianapolis White Castle.

The altercation apparently started sometime after 3 a.m., when one of the judges, Sabrina Bell, raised a middle finger at two men yelling from a passing SUV, and ended after one of those men shot two of the judges.

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