Jon Stewart

NBCUniversal

Jerry Seinfeld's “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" is on the move -- from Sony's Crackle streaming service to Netflix late this year, Variety says.

Tribune Broadcasting

Before we welcome 2016, let’s look back at this year in TV, movies, radio and media from A to Z.

NBCUniversal

You’ll never watch Jimmy Fallon’s “Tonight Show” the same way after reading this column.

I always learn a lot about TV when former NBC late-night programming executive Rick Ludwin returns to speak to students at Miami University, his alma mater.

On Thursday night, he revealed NBC's camera tricks on Fallon’s top-rated “Tonight Show” to overcome limitations of cramped Studio 6B in New York’s Rockefeller Center – and a few other observations about Stephen Colbert and the changes in TV’s late-night landscape.

Fox Broadcasting

Four new fall TV series debut this week – including the heavily promoted Fox comedies starring John Stamos and Dayton native Rob Lowe – but the biggest TV event is the reboot of “The Daily Show” with Trevor Noah Monday night.

The South African comedian has the unenviable task of taking over the anchor desk from Jon Stewart, who won 22 Emmy Awards there, including best Variety Talk Series and best Variety Talk Series Writing last week.

Provided by Comedy Central

If you’re recording Jon Stewart’s last “The Daily Show” at 11 p.m. Thursday, set the DVR for an hour. Comedy Central’s schedule plans for at least a 50-minute farewell for Stewart, who’s leaving the show after 16 years.

Before Stewart says goodbye, Comedy Central will air a 12-hour marathon Thursday, starting with a repeat of Monday’s show with Amy Schumer (10:28 a.m. Thursday) and Tuesday’s show with Denis Leary (11:01 a.m.).

The reruns shows with Steve Carell (1:17 p.m.), Newt Gingrich (4:38 p.m.), Bill O’Reilly (5:38 p.m.), President Barack Obama (7:20 p.m.) and a special called “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: News Your Own Adventure” (8:56 p.m.). 

Provided by Comedy Central

Call him a comedian, call him a political satirist, call him an unabashed liberal. But to me, Jon Stewart is arguably the most influential comedian of our time.

Stewart leaves “The Daily Show” (11 p.m., Comedy Central) Thursday after 16 years with 19 Emmys for his blistering satires and holding politicians accountable. He turned a late-night comedy show originally hosted by former ESPN anchor Craig Kilborn (1996-98) into Must See TV, skewering politicians on the right and left. He wasn’t afraid to argue with President Barack Obama, members of congress or political commentators.

Here’s his final guest list: