Kentucky

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has become the first senator to test positive for the coronavirus. His staff says he is asymptomatic.

In a statement released on Sunday, Paul's deputy chief of staff, Sergio Gor, wrote:

Kentuckians will be able to use more documents to obtain REAL ID licenses under a bill nearing final passage in the state legislature.

The measure would add property tax bills, current driver’s licenses and postmarked mail less than a year old to the list of documents Kentuckians can use to prove their identities to get the enhanced-security ID cards.

The bill comes as Kentucky is scrambling to get more citizens outfitted with REAL IDs and setting up regional offices around the state for citizens to obtain them.

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Updated 7:16 p.m.

A 66-year-old Kenton County woman is Northern Kentucky's first confirmed case of COVID-19, health department officials announced Wednesday. The individual is in isolation at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Ft. Thomas. 

When local health officers issued simultaneous orders on March 16 for all residents of seven counties in the San Francisco Bay area to "shelter at their place of residence," Arnab Mukherjea thought it was "a bit draconian" for him as well as his wife and two young children.

Kentucky is delaying its May primary elections by more than a month, the latest in a series of crowd restrictions announced to try and limit the spread of coronavirus.

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Timothy D. Easley / AP

Gov. Andy Beshear has announced that all bars and restaurants in Kentucky will close to in-person traffic starting 5:00 Monday evening in response to coronavirus.

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Bruce Schreiner / AP

At least 20 people are confirmed to have the coronavirus in at least seven Kentucky counties, Governor Andy Beshear announced during a Sunday afternoon press conference, where he also said he, too, has taken a test for COVID-19. At least one of the confirmed patients is not expected to survive, while another patient in Nelson County refused to self-isolate and now has a sheriff’s deputy parked outside their home. 

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AP

WVXU reporters and its network of member stations are working hard to bring you all the latest information on coronavirus in our region. We will carry presidential and gubernatorial addresses on air and online when possible. 

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Along with many local universities, Boone County Schools on Wednesday announced that starting next week, there will be no in-person classes and instead, students will be working form home up to April 20.

The Kentucky House of Representatives passed a bill that would add language to the state constitution saying that it guarantees no right for women to get abortions.

  Gov. Andy Beshear has announced three more confirmed cases of coronavirus in Kentucky, making four total cases in the state.

Gov. Andy Beshear’s administration has launched a website where Kentuckians with felony records can determine if they have had their voting rights restored.

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James Crisp / AP

Snow is melting faster in Kentucky as warmer average winters bring about fewer days of snow cover, according to State Climatologist Stuart Foster.

The Kentucky House of Representatives has passed a bill that would require voters to show a photo ID in order to cast ballots in this year’s General Election, a top legislative priority for Republican leaders in the legislature.

After significant revisions, the measure provides several ways for those without photo IDs to vote, but opponents of the legislation say it will suppress voter turnout and create confusion for voters and election officials. Because of those revisions, the bill will go back to the Senate for final approval before heading to Gov. Andy Beshear.

On Tuesday, Rep. Angie Hatton, a Democrat from Whitesburg, was gaveled down by the House Speaker after accusing Republicans of pushing the bill for political reasons.


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About four years ago, Chuck Patton sold the advertising company he founded and then went searching for his next opportunity.

On a trip to Charleston, South Carolina, the Fort Thomas native who now lives in Louisville, found it.

Boone County Judge/Executive Gary Moore has led his Northern Kentucky county through unprecedented growth. It is one of the fastest-growing counties in all of Kentucky.

The percentage of middle school students in Kentucky using electronic cigarettes and other vaping products has doubled since 2017. 

The Youth Risk Behavior Survey conducted last spring shows the rate of vaping increased from 15.1% in 2017, to 31.4% in 2019.  High school students saw a nine percent jump in the same time period. 

"The Department for Public Health is really working to provide resources to schools and communities to do what we can to prevent students from using these products and to get them to quit using them," said Stephanie Bungee, a school health consultant with the Kentucky Department of Education.

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Jim Nolan / WVXU

Cincinnati City Councilwoman Tamaya Dennard was arrested this week on federal charges that allege she accept payment in exchange for votes related to riverfront development. Some local leaders are calling for her resignation.

The state’s first charter school applicant, River Cities Academy, lost its appeal to the Kentucky Board of Education. The board decided Tuesday not to overturn a decision by Newport Independent Schools to deny the group a charter.

A group of parents in Northern Kentucky wanted to open the state’s first charter school, called River Cities Academy (RCA), pulling students from six districts along the river. According to the application, the school was to serve a “diverse learner population” in grades K-8, and focus on closing the achievement gap through experiential learning.

In 19 Kentucky school districts, when a student misbehaves, teachers or principals can still use a paddle to spank students on the behind. Last year, educators used paddling to discipline students at least 284 times — mostly in Eastern and South-Central Kentucky. The state keeps track of how often schools use it, and on who.

Kentucky is one of 19 states where corporal punishment is legal in public schools. That means it’s legal for educators in public schools to inflict pain as a form of discipline, usually through spanking. But state lawmakers are considering legislation that would ban the practice.

 


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