Ku Klux Klan

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

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John Minchillo / AP

My hometown – Dayton, Ohio – deserves credit for a lot of things over the years: powered flight, the cash register, Huffy Bicycles, the pop-top soda can and hundreds of other inventions.

But Dayton and its surrounding communities rarely get the credit they deserve.

Dayton activists have organized a number of events this Saturday for residents planning to stay away from Courthouse Square during a planned rally by an Indiana-based KKK-group.
 

The Dayton Unit NAACP is sponsoring two events in response to the rally. On Saturday, the group is holding what it calls a "family-friendly community celebration of love, peace, unity, and diversity" at McIntosh Park in Dayton. The event runs from 1 to 3 p.m.

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Jim Nolan / WVXU

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin didn't expect such narrow margins in Tuesday's primary. He managed to win the Republican Party nomination with 52 percent of the vote, to face Attorney General Andy Beshear in November. The victory lays the groundwork for a bitter gubernatorial battle. Beshear has filed several lawsuits against the Bevin Administration. Now the two will spar on the campaign trail.

The city of Dayton has reached an agreement with an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan-affiliated group set to rally in Courthouse Square later this month.

The deal settles a lawsuit the city brought against the Honorable Sacred Knights over the rally and lays out the rules for the white supremacist group’s gathering.

The terms of the consent decree filed in Montgomery County civil court stipulate that Honorable Sacred Knights members will be permitted to wear masks to the rally.

Activists have released details of a plan to counterprotest an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group’s rally set for Dayton later this month.

At a forum Thursday at Mt. Enon Missionary Baptist Church, members of the Better Dayton Coalition and the Dayton Police Department urged potential demonstrators to maintain their safety and consider staying home. Dayton Public Schools officials are also asking young people to steer clear of downtown Dayton during the May 25 Honorable Sacred Knights rally.

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an out-of-state group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

Last month, Montgomery County, which oversees Courthouse Square, granted the Indiana group believed to be affiliated with the KKK permission to rally on May 25th.

A Dayton coalition planning a counterprotest at an upcoming Ku Klux Klan-affiliated rally, scheduled for late May in Courthouse Square, gathered Saturday at a townhall meeting to outline their plans.

The A Better Dayton Coalition includes members of Black Lives Matter Miami Valley, and six other grassroots and faith-based community organizations, including the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the New Black Panther Party. 

The city of Dayton is asking a group associated with the Ku Klux Klan to reconsider its request for a permit to rally in the city.

The out-of-state group, called the Honorable Sacred Knights of Indiana, is planning to hold a rally on Courthouse Square on Saturday May 25.

The group’s Facebook page describes the organization as a nonprofit christian group.

Honorable Sacred Knights originally submitted its permit request using fake names, Montgomery County officials say.