lawn care

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Now that it seems spring is finally here for good, it's time to see what kind of shape your yard and garden are in, plan what you would like to grow this year, and take steps now that will make caring for your plants, trees and lawns much easier this summer.

Steve Cummings

Over the last several years, an increasing interest in learning more about where our foods come from and a desire to eat healthier have prompted more people living in urban areas to grow their own fruits and vegetables.

WVXU, Pete Rightmire

Flowers are in bloom, lawns are turning a deep green and spring is in the air. But there is still a chance we could experience hard frosts and even snow before the warm weather finally settles in.

We are accustomed to odd weather in the Tri-state, but this summer has been particularly unusual: heavy rains and unseasonably low temperatures followed by days of intense, dry heat, followed by more rain and cooler days. One morning it’'s August, the next October, then we'’re back to August again. It’'s posed a real challenge to farmers and anyone trying to keep their lawns and gardens healthy.

Finally, with the nicer weather, most of us are spending more time outdoors, and we'’re paying more attention to the shape of our yards, trees, and gardens. And more often than not, we see plenty of room for improvement.

  It’'s never a sure thing this time of year, but it looks as if we’'ve seen the last of the hard frosts. Most folks have cut their grass at least once or twice already, although it may still be too wet to get your gardens started.