mental health

Across the United States, parents of children with severe mental health issues can face an excruciating decision: If they can't afford costly healthcare, they may have to sign over custody to the state. That way, the government will pay for the child's care. Now those parents are fighting for change, and a chunk of Ohio's budget.

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A local Sharonville business hopes to give people techniques to reduce stress during Mental Health Awareness month.

jail
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According to the National Stepping Up Initiative, in the U.S. approximately 2 million times each year, people who have serious mental illnesses are admitted to jails. These individuals often don't receive appropriate, or any, treatment, and, upon release, are at a higher risk of re-incarceration than those without mental illnesses.

mental health apps
WVXU

There are tens of thousands of mental health mobile apps, with new ones coming and going every day. Miami University researchers looked at studies about those apps - and hundreds of apps themselves - to learn whether they're helping or hurting people.

Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

A pilot program is underway at The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County where social service agencies are handing out literature to people who might need help with mental health, addiction recovery and other services.

The National Alliance for Mental Illness says about two million people with mental illnesses are booked into jails every year.

But most counties aren’t properly equipped to treat those people while they’re in custody. The problem is especially big in Indiana, where many jails are housing far more inmates than they are supposed to. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

In Ohio and across the country, jails are becoming defacto hospitals with more than 30 percent of inmates suffering from mental illness. The national program Stepping Up will now include Hamilton County after county commissioners voted to enhance existing efforts late last year.

Yvonne Martin keeps detailed notes of two years in her life. It starts on March 1, 2016. That’s the day her son, Daniel, first ran away from the family’s home near Evansville, Ind.

He was 13.

Stress is a normal part of life. And there’s even such thing as a “good” level of stress that keeps us going, according to psychology researchers Sanda and Florin Dolcos at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

But severe stress can interfere with day-to-day living, and this can be particularly challenging during the holiday season, they say.

fifth third shooting
John Minchillo / AP

The September 6 shooting at the Fifth Third Center at Fountain Square left four people, including the shooter, dead, and two more wounded. But even people who were there that did not suffer physical harm during the shooting may be experiencing lasting emotional effects.

Dayton Police

A third of Dayton's police force is part of a pilot study to reduce stress using brain stimulation. One hundred  officers are now in the fourth week of a six-week study for the therapy, already proven effective in both civilians and military.

Ohio’s U.S. Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown are proposing a major policy shift for residential treatment facilities. Addiction recovery advocates say the change in Congress will help treatment centers open their doors to more people in need. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Five local school districts in Butler County are asking voters to approve a levy to pay for extra security and mental health resources. The Butler County Educational Service Center (ESC) is putting the 1.5 mill, 10-year levy on the November ballot. The levy would add about $53 to every $100,000 of property value.

Editor's note: Mike Quirk was originally misidentified in this story.

Mental-health care can be hard to access in much of Ohio, especially away from the larger cities. This installment of our series Navigating the Path to Mental Health looks at the challenges along the way to finding and getting mental-health services.

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While the majority of individuals who don’t have access to safe and secure housing are in their situations due to economic reasons, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 20 to 25 percent of the homeless population in the United States suffers from some form of severe mental illness.

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The diagnosis of mental disorders is largely based on looking at a patient's history to determine signs and symptoms that, collectively, lead to a recognizable syndrome. Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, known as ADHD, can include hyperactivity, fidgeting, trouble focusing or the need to get up frequently. But youth at risk for bipolar disorder often initially present signs of having ADHD.

When Fears Turn Into Phobias

Oct 11, 2016
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Some peoples’ clown phobias may have been triggered with the bizarre string of clown sightings, threats and arrests throughout Ohio and the nation. The fear of clowns is known as Coulrophobia, one of hundreds of phobias people may have.

en.wikipedia.org, available for use

Music and dance can be powerful, promoting a sense of wellness, bringing joy and healing, and uniting people. Music and dance therapies are research-based health practices that can improve an individual's physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs. 

en.wikipedia.org, available for use

  

About six million Americans age 65 and older experience symptoms of depression. Though common among the elderly, depression is not a normal part of aging. 

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  Note: This program originally aired August 4, 2016.

According to a survey conducted by Public Citizen and the Treatment Advocacy Center, U.S. state prisons and county jails have as many as 10 times more seriously mentally ill inmates than state psychiatric hospitals. 

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