naloxone

antiOD
Andrew Higley / UC Creative Services

There's a new device that dispenses the opioid-reversing drug naloxone, and the University of Cincinnati professor who invented it plans to put it inside Cincinnati buildings this spring.

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Local health officials are reporting a spike in the number of drug overdoses. Hamilton County Public Health reports 17 people arrived at hospital emergency rooms, and emergency responders received 21 calls for help from Tuesday morning to Wednesday night.

A few months ago, Kourtnaye Sturgeon helped save someone's life. She was driving in downtown Indianapolis when she saw people gathered around a car on the side of the road. Sturgeon pulled over and a man told her there was nothing she could do: Two men had overdosed on opioids and appeared to be dead.

"I kind of recall saying, 'No man, I've got Narcan,' " she says, referring to the brand- name version of the opioid overdose antidote, naloxone. "Which sounds so silly, but I'm pretty sure that's what came out."

It was a scheduling mishap that led Kourtnaye Sturgeon to help save someone’s life. About four months ago, Sturgeon drove to downtown Indianapolis for a meeting. She was a week early.

“I wasn’t supposed to be there,” she said.


As opioid-related deaths have continued to climb, naloxone, a drug that can reverse overdoses, has become an important part of the public health response.

When people overdosing struggle to breathe, naloxone can restore normal breathing and save their lives. But the drug has to be given quickly.

On Thursday, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams issued an advisory that encouraged more people to routinely carry naloxone.

Combating The Heroin Epidemic: Hamilton County

Mar 14, 2016
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Last month, Kroger made Naloxone, a heroin-overdose reversal medication, available without a prescription in the Tri-state. The drug works within minutes and it is believed will save many lives. Ohio and Kentucky rank in the top five for highest overdose death rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control; heroin and prescription pain relievers like fentanyl are responsible for a majority of those deaths.

provided / Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Ohio-based grocery chain Kroger will make an opioid overdose antidote available without a prescription in its pharmacies across Ohio and northern Kentucky.