National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Harjinder Singh Chauhan and Balpreet Kaur

Aug 2, 2017

On this week's StoryCorps in Cincinnati: Harjinder Singh Chauhan is Indian by heritage, Kenyan by birth and attended university in London. 

Grace Yek, J Web Holes, and daughter Victoria

Jul 25, 2017

This week: 

James Avant and Brandon Reynolds

Jul 19, 2017

James Avant had aspirations to be a doctor, but has discovered a passion and career as a baker. 

Barbara and Jennifer Neumann

Jul 12, 2017

Barbara Neumann grew up in the 1950's as a Japanese American whose parents spent time in an internment camp. 

Joy And Rosie Lawrence Slater

Jul 5, 2017

Rosie Lawrence Slater was born with a very rare disorder known as Kabuki Syndrome which affects her both physically and developmentally. 

Salwa El-Magoli and Yen Hsieh

Jun 27, 2017

On this week's StoryCorps in Cincinnati: Salwa El-Magoli is a groundbreaking academic, the first female dean of the agriculture faculty at Cairo University. Yen Hsieh, is a former P&G researcher who founded FlavorDrive, a local culinary and formulation company, and is board chair of Asian Community Alliance, a nonprofit organization serving Asians in the greater Cincinnati area. 

Carl Westmoreland With His Son, Guy

Jun 21, 2017

Carl Westmoreland is the senior historian at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and is a nationally recognized authority on African American history. 

Johnny Johnson & His Daughter, Maria Papakirk

Jun 14, 2017

Johnny Johnson, the patriarch of Camp Washington Chili, talks with his daughter, Maria Papakirk, in this StoryCorps in Cincinnati

William J. And Cassandra Jones

Jun 6, 2017

Today's StoryCorps in Cincinnati is a loving conversation between local photographer William J. Jones and his wife, Cassandra, who happens to be blind.

WVXU/Jim Nolan

Founded in 2003, the nonprofit organization StoryCorps has given more than 100,000 Americans the chance to record interviews about their lives, pass wisdom from one generation to the next, and leave a legacy for the future. It is the largest single collection of human voices ever gathered.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

"Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another."

Those famous words from the late South African anti-apartheid leader begin the new exhibit at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center commemorating the life of Nelson Mandela.

Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women is a pop-up exhibit of church hats worn by African American women, now on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

et_wikipedia.org

In August 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American boy, was kidnapped and murdered by two white men in Money, Mississippi for reportedly flirting with a white woman. An all-white, male jury acquitted the men, who later admitted their guilt.

Scott Kissell / Miami University

My old friend Jim Freidman was the most creative Cincinnati TV producer I ever wrote about – and I wrote a lot about his   "Best & Worst of Cincinnati," "Celebrate Cincinnati," "The Magic of Television" and Dreambuilders specials.

So it's no surprise to me that Friedman has been honored for his creativity in his current career at Miami University, as the White Family Clinical Faculty in the Institute for Entrepreneurship at the Farmer School of Business.

Provided, image by Lisa Kristine

Humanitarian photographer Lisa Kristine, who specializes in indigenous peoples worldwide, uses her powerful images and intimate portrayals to elevate awareness of social causes such as modern slavery. The United Nations estimates there are approximately 27 to 30 million individuals caught in the slave trade industry today.

WKRC-TV

WKRC-TV will air a commercial-free hour Monday on  “Childhood Poverty: Cincinnati’s Crisis,” a topic explored by Channel 12 reporters since last fall.

Anchor Brad Johansen will host the discussion with local poverty experts before an invitation-only audience at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center 7 p.m. Monday.

nydailynews.com

More than fifty years have passed since the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington. While we have seen advances in racial equality since then, a recent Gallup poll shows a majority of Americans regard tension between the races as one of the most serious challenges facing the nation today.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A rare copy of the 13th Amendment is now on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. 

Director of Museum Experiences Richard Cooper says this particular copy was originally owned by Schuyler Colfax, who was the Speaker of the House when the amendment was drafted.

Jane Durrell talks with Dr. Clarence G. Newsome, president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, about their current exhibition featuring the 13th Amendment and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Provided, , the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

The call for athletic programs to stop using representations of American Indians as team names and mascots began in the 1960s, and just last week, President Obama once again publicly urged professional and school programs to change names that are considered offensive. But many feel the use of American Indian symbols in sports is more than offensive.

Provided / National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

A rare, handwritten copy of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is coming to Cincinnati. The copy is known as the Schuyler Colfax copy, and is one of 14 signed by President Lincoln in addition to the original.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center says document will go on display in January.

Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

The public is invited to a “community conversation” about media coverage of the July shooting death of Sam DuBose by former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing 7:30-9 p.m. Oct. 8 at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s Harriet Tubman Theater.

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A signed copy of the Emancipation Proclamation will be on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center starting Friday.

Freedom Center president Clarence Newsome says Friday is the 150th anniversary of Emancipation Day, also known as Juneteenth.

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Betty Ann Smiddy of the Hamilton Avenue Road to Freedom Committee tells the story best:

"On a rainy night of April 3, 1853, 28 courageous African-Americans escaped their bondage in Boone County, Kentucky. Led by abolitionist John Fairfield, they crossed the Ohio River near Lawrenceburg, Indiana and followed him to the mouth of the Mill Creek, where they temporarily hid.

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