nuclear energy

The battle over the energy law that starts providing subsidies to Ohio’s two nuclear power plants in 2021 may not be over.

Republican House members are sponsoring a resolution that would prohibit foreign businesses and individuals from having a majority ownership in things like power plants, power lines, pipelines, and water.

Opponents of the nuclear power plant bailout declined to submit signatures before the state-mandated deadline for their bid to get a referendum on the law on the 2020 ballot.

The Ohio Attorney General is looking into allegations that a nuclear bailout group is trying to pay off petitioners and to buy the signatures they've gathered. 

The controversial U.S. Supreme Court decision Citizens United v FEC almost a decade ago helped bring in hundreds of millions of dollars into political campaigns – and the groups that get some of it don’t have to disclose where it came from.

Ballot efforts typically ramp up in the weeks before an election. The fight over Ohio’s new nuclear bailout law, though, is in full swing more than a year before a possible vote.

So why the early start? One side says it’s to keep two nuclear power plants from closing, while experts say spending now may be the best investment.

The League of Women Voters and Common Cause Ohio are joining forces to call out the lack of transparency in the scathing campaign against the nuclear bailout referendum attempt.

A person gathering signatures to put the nuclear power bailout law on next year's ballot called police to report an assault in Dublin. The alleged instigator is accused of working for the opposing group trying to keep the nuclear bailout law, created through HB6, in place.

A group fighting to protect the state law that bails out nuclear power plants is plastering the state with fliers urging people not to sign a petition that would put a rejection of the bailout before voters, connecting the referendum effort to Chinese government interests. 

FirstEnergy Solutions, the owner of Ohio's two nuclear plants, is asking the Ohio Supreme Court to stop a potential referendum on next year's ballot. That initiative would hold a referendum on HB6 which bails out FirstEnergy Solutions' two nuclear power plants.

The group Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts, opponents of Ohio’s nuclear power plant bailout law, are one step closer to begin collecting the signatures they need to put a referendum on next year's ballot. 

A group is looking to collect signatures statewide to ask voters to overturn the law that bails out nuclear power plants. But a competing group has formed to argue in favor of the ratepayer subsidies.

A debate is brewing over whether a group can put the state’s new nuclear bailout bill before voters next year as referendum. The dispute questions if the increased rate on electric bills should be considered a tax increase. 

The Ohio House Speaker said opponents of the new law that will give $150 million a year in subsidies to Ohio’s two nuclear power plants owned by FirstEnergy Solutions will need big money to overturn it. 

Ohio legislators have passed new energy laws that affects everyone’s electric bills and change the state’s course on green energy policies. But it can be easy to get bogged down by all the information contained in the bill, here's a breakdown.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts is leading the charge for a possible ballot referendum to stop the new energy law that would bail out the state's two nuclear plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies a year.

The Ohio House has voted in favor of the sweeping energy bill, HB6, that bails out two nuclear power plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies.

Gov. Mike DeWine says the proposed law that creates subsidies for nuclear, coal, and solar energy hits his main energy priorities.

The sweeping energy bill that could save nuclear plants from shutting down while making big cuts to renewable and efficiency policies was put on hold with possible "yes" votes not present at the Ohio Statehouse.

A new version of the comprehensive energy bill, HB6, was introduced in the Ohio Senate on Monday that would charge residential ratepayers $0.85 a month on their electric bills to bail out the state's two nuclear power plants.

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