nuclear energy

An Ohio Senate committee held a hearing on two different pieces of legislation that address the sweeping energy law, HB6, which creates more than $1 billion in subsidies for nuclear and coal plants. Legislators now have three options in front of them to deal with the bill connected to a $61 million corruption case; keep the law in place, repeal it, or partially repeal the law.

Columbus and Cincinnati have filed a lawsuit to halt increased electricity fees tied to HB6, the nuclear power plant bailout at the center of a federal racketeering probe.

Opponents of HB6, Ohio's sweeping energy law, gathered for an official virtual hearing to make their voice heard. That includes one of the whistleblowers who went to the FBI to report potential corruption which played a role a federal racketeering case.

The Ohio House committee holding meetings on a potential repeal of HB6, a sweeping energy law, heard testimony from the leader of Ohio's utility regulatory commission. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio chair was accused of having his own conflict of interest when it comes to the bailout. 

first energy solutions
Ron Schwane / AP

A bill to repeal Ohio's nuclear bailout law has languished for more than a month so far, and signs suggest that House leadership may be angling to defer or stop such efforts as Election Day draws near.

The Ohio House and Senate both addressed the potential repeal of the nuclear power plant bailout in different ways at the Statehouse on Tuesday. As Democrats call for a quick repeal, Republicans move ahead with a different approach.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost says he's considering taking legal action to stall the billion-dollar nuclear power plant bailout as legislators consider a possible repeal to the law that created the subsidies.

larry householder
Jay LaPrete / AP

The arrest of Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder and others charged in an alleged $60 million bribery scheme has led to calls for the Republican lawmaker's resignation and a repeal of the legislation at the center of it all.

HB 6 Repeal Would Address Only Part Of Lawmakers' Actions To Slow Renewables

Jul 24, 2020
first energy solutions
Ron Schwane / AP

Both Republican and Democratic Ohio lawmakers are pushing to repeal the state's nuclear bailout bill after this week's release of a federal criminal complaint against House Speaker Larry Householder and others. Clean energy advocates say that would be a start, but more is needed to address eight years of lawmakers' actions to slow the growth of renewables in the state.

Story updated Thursday, July 23 at 2:20 p.m.

Gov. Mike DeWine is now calling on Ohio lawmakers to repeal and replace HB6, the sweeping bill that bailed out two nuclear power plants while slashing renewable energy efforts, following the arrest of House Speaker Larry Householder.

The battle over the energy law that starts providing subsidies to Ohio’s two nuclear power plants in 2021 may not be over.

Republican House members are sponsoring a resolution that would prohibit foreign businesses and individuals from having a majority ownership in things like power plants, power lines, pipelines, and water.

Opponents of the nuclear power plant bailout declined to submit signatures before the state-mandated deadline for their bid to get a referendum on the law on the 2020 ballot.

The Ohio Attorney General is looking into allegations that a nuclear bailout group is trying to pay off petitioners and to buy the signatures they've gathered. 

The controversial U.S. Supreme Court decision Citizens United v FEC almost a decade ago helped bring in hundreds of millions of dollars into political campaigns – and the groups that get some of it don’t have to disclose where it came from.

Ballot efforts typically ramp up in the weeks before an election. The fight over Ohio’s new nuclear bailout law, though, is in full swing more than a year before a possible vote.

So why the early start? One side says it’s to keep two nuclear power plants from closing, while experts say spending now may be the best investment.

The League of Women Voters and Common Cause Ohio are joining forces to call out the lack of transparency in the scathing campaign against the nuclear bailout referendum attempt.

A person gathering signatures to put the nuclear power bailout law on next year's ballot called police to report an assault in Dublin. The alleged instigator is accused of working for the opposing group trying to keep the nuclear bailout law, created through HB6, in place.

A group fighting to protect the state law that bails out nuclear power plants is plastering the state with fliers urging people not to sign a petition that would put a rejection of the bailout before voters, connecting the referendum effort to Chinese government interests. 

FirstEnergy Solutions, the owner of Ohio's two nuclear plants, is asking the Ohio Supreme Court to stop a potential referendum on next year's ballot. That initiative would hold a referendum on HB6 which bails out FirstEnergy Solutions' two nuclear power plants.

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