obesity

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In the largest study of its kind, brain scans show people who are overweight and obese have a greater chance of reduced blood flow and brain activity. Scientists say low blood flow is a risk factor in developing Alzheimer's disease.

If you made a New Year's resolution to be more healthy - maybe drop some pounds - then this story is for you. A new national survey from the Cleveland Clinic shows that Americans, by and large, are concerned about their weight and worried about heart disease. But are they doing something about it? That's another story.

More than 70 percent of the roughly 1,000 adults surveyed said they were worried about their weight, but less than half had made changes to their diet in order to lose weight. And carrying those extra pounds is putting them in jeopardy of serious health problems. 

A new annual report by the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shows Ohio's current obesity rate is 33.8 percent, up from nearly 20 percent in the year 2000. 

Provided

With the rising health challenges of obesity, diabetes and heart disease many patients find they need to adopt a whole new lifestyle to improve their health, and that includes diet. Physicians, however, receive little nutrition education in medical school and even less during residency, according to Dr. Josephine Elrod of Grandview Medical Center.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Note: This originally aired on July 31, 2013.

Scientists are just beginning to learn how the body’s hormones are programmed to melt away fat. More hormones in combination with minor surgery may be the solution for the obese. 


A new study published by Pediatrics says obesity is the largest predictor of earlier onset puberty in girls. Researchers in Cincinnati (Children's Hospital), San Francisco and New York City studied 1,239 girls ranging in age from 6 to 8 at enrollment and followed at regular intervals from 2004 to 2011.

Girls with early maturation have greater risk of these:

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati is expanding its Task Force on Healthy Living to include several organizations.  The newest members represent the public schools, the city's parks and recreation departments and the soft drink industry. 

Council Member Wendell Young chairs the task force.