Ohio News

Lawmakers who’ve wanted to stop the impending explosion in the number of school buildings where students will be eligible for the state’s largest private school voucher program say there’s a deal in the works. But parents and students already in the EdChoice program want it to stay and expand.

Ohio's highest court has rejected a recommendation to allow judges throughout the state use “risk-assessment tools” to determine the amount of bail they require from defendants. 

A bill to prevent doctors from using telemedicine to provide abortion-inducing drugs has been introduced. But backers of the bill don't know of any cases where that is happening in Ohio right now.

The common cold is…well….common. And the Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, that babies and older people can get after being around someone who appears to have a cold, is not new. But it’s the second leading cause of infant death. RSV cases, especially among babies, are increasing significantly.

U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) says the new trade deal with China will level the playing field with the U.S., but he urges trade negotiators to be firm as they work on Phase Two.

There are many commemorations of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday across Ohio – including the largest in the country, the MLK breakfast in Columbus. Among those observances was a state sponsored event at a Columbus church.

The number of public school buildings where students will be eligible for the state’s largest private school voucher program will more than double in the coming school year. And that could blow huge holes in the budgets of 70 percent of Ohio’s school districts. Lawmakers who have said they want to change that are running out of time.

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is blasting the White House's trade deal with China, calling it "much ado about nothing." While U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) calls the deal a "good first step."

Two Republican Ohio House members want to introduce a bill soon that would eliminate the prevailing wage on construction projects. And that puts the GOP leader of that chamber in a spot.

For the first time in eight years, Ohio’s governor will deliver two consecutive State of the State speeches at the state capitol.

Starting on Thursday, every committee hearing at the Ohio Statehouse will be streamed live or recorded and broadcast later.

Rep. Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Heights) says her high-profile domestic violence bill is gaining momentum in the Ohio House. The bipartisan piece of legislation known as "Aisha's Law" looks to overhaul the way communities and law enforcement respond to reports of assault.

Thousands of retirees will see changes to their health care benefits after the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System (OPERS) Board of Directors approved a new plan for the way members receive assistance.

The director of Ohio Medicaid says her agency is dealing with big problems and could face huge fines from the federal government if they’re not fixed. And she’s pointing to the administration of former Gov. John Kasich for creating and not handling those mistakes.

There hasn’t been a killer put to death in Ohio in 18 months. And the state’s last execution has likely taken place, according to the architect of Ohio’s 1981 death penalty law. But prosecutors say killing off capital punishment entirely would be a mistake.

A pair of bills in the Ohio Legislature would change the way people register to vote, making it an automated process instead requiring them to fill out forms or go online. People could still opt out of the process in both. But the new bill in the House would do it differently than a Senate proposal.

An annual one-night nationwide homelessness survey mandated by the U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development showed a slight uptick in Ohio's population.

Weather and tariffs have created some tough conditions for Ohio farmers and agribusinesses. But they can get some relief through a state program that reduces the interest on the debt they incur for their operations. 

Deadly drug overdoses in Ohio fell nearly 22 percent in 2018, to the lowest number in three years. And overdose deaths dropped in every category of drugs except one.

A Cincinnati abortion clinic that recently lost the variance it needs to operate thinks the problem is now resolved. 

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