Ohio News

The Ohio National Guard is working with public health leaders all around the state in what they say is a coordinated effort to prepare for the peak of the coronavirus.

Nearly 200,000 Ohioans have filed unemployment claims in the last two weeks, and more are likely to need those benefits soon. But many are reporting still having problems getting through either by the phone lines or online, as the state has been struggling to keep up with a system not built for this kind of volume.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, Planned Parenthood Federation of America and some Ohio attorneys have filed an emergency lawsuit against the state.

The Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead to Columbus-based Battelle for its full request to sterilize 80,000 N-95 surgical masks per machine per day, after issuing a letter earlier in the day permitting far less. And it comes after pressure from Ohio officials.

Millions of Ohioans are staying home as ordered, as schools have closed, employers have ordered them to work remotely and entertainment options have been shut down. And hundreds of thousands have lost their jobs as businesses shuttered – perhaps temporarily or maybe permanently. All of these sudden changes are having an impact on Ohioans who are now living very different lives than just a few weeks ago.

The state is working on building up medical capacity for when the coronavirus is expected to hit its peak, now predicted for mid-May. The state has said there could be up to 10,000 cases per day at that point. While this includes creating more spaces for patients, it also means stocking up on gear known as personal protection equipment.

More than 187,000 Ohioans filed for unemployment this week, and many more are worried about their jobs and their businesses. The state has said that businesses that consider themselves essential as described by Ohio’s stay at home order can stay open, but they must be following safety guidelines. And if they’re not, they could face penalties.

Updated, March 29, 10:00 p.m.

Several large metal shipping containers are lined up in a warehouse on Columbus’ West Side under a large American Flag. Their doors are ajar, and workers stream in and out, power tools buzzing.

With a 30 percent increase in confirmed coronavirus cases in 24 hours and a new total of 19 deaths, new projections on the spread of coronavirus in Ohio suggest the state could be seeing 10,000 cases a day by the time it peaks.

The more than 10,000 people in Ohio identified as homeless are already at a higher risk for catching communicable diseases but the coronavirus pandemic is making matters worse. 

The Ohio Democratic Party has dropped its lawsuit over the postponed Election Day. 

Ohio is heavily relying on data and statistics in its fight against coronavirus since the state is running low on tests. Health officials say the latest research shows Ohio's social distancing is working, but there's still more to do.

Seventeen people have been tested for coronavirus in five Ohio prisons – 13 results were negative and the rest are pending, and those inmates are in isolation. Those numbers come from a new daily update that the state is now providing on testing in prisons and youth facilities. 

The number of COVID-19 deaths in Ohio increased by 50% as the state unveiled an upgraded dashboard with more details on the spread of the coronavirus. The Ohio Department of Health announced Thursday that 15 people have died, five more from the day before.

The state is unveiling a new dashboard for those tracking coronavirus in Ohio, with breakdowns of the data that's coming in on where those cases are and who's being tested. 15 deaths were announced today, five more than yesterday.

As Ohio logs hundreds of new coronavirus cases every day, concerns are growing about the state's hospital systems and their ability to handle an expected influx of patients. 

The bill that made some changes across state law related to coronavirus also set a new ending for the Ohio primary, after polling places were shut down just hours before election day.

The legislation making changes across a variety of state policies because of coronavirus also settled an issue that lawmakers had been struggling with for months. That’s the question of how many students would qualify next school year for the state’s largest private school voucher program.

State officials say they are putting every resource they have into ramping up Ohio's unemployment compensation website. The site has been crashing due to the massive influx in requests.

The state's Stay At Home order has forced many people to lose their jobs or their source of income which means money can be tight when it comes time to pay rent. Gov. Mike DeWine is hinting at a possible announcement when it comes to evictions and foreclosures.

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