Ohio presidential primary

joe biden bernie sanders
Elise Amendola / AP

Ohio's presidential primary on March 17 was once expected to be a dull affair, with little impact on the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

democratic debate
Chris Carlson / AP

The Ohio Secretary of State's office says 11 Democratic presidential candidates have filed to run in Ohio's March 17 primary. But chances are many of them will no longer be running by then, even if their names remain on the ballot. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about Tuesday's Ohio presidential primary and how it will make or break Ohio Gov. John Kasich's bid for the GOP nomination. That's why Donald Trump is working hard to stop Kasich in Ohio. 

In a speech before a wildly enthusiastic crowd, billionaire and GOP presidential contender Donald J. Trump bounced from one subject to another in a stream-of-consciousness speech.

Some of it was familiar ground – criticism of the news media, Hillary Clinton, Ohio Gov. John Kasich (his principal opponent in Tuesday’s Ohio primary) and his insistence that, as president, he will build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico “and make Mexico pay for it.”

  SHARONVILLE - In his nearly eight months of campaigning for the GOP presidential nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich has been, as he described it to hundreds of friendly suburban Republicans here Saturday morning, “unrelentingly positive.”

He has not engaged in the name-calling and yelling that has marked most of the televised GOP candidate debates. But he has also never called out his chief rival in Tuesday’s critical Ohio primary, billionaire Donald J. Trump, for the angry tone he has set for his campaign or the violence that often erupts at his campaign events.

UPDATED 9:23 AM SATURDAY:

A release from the Donald J. Trump Campaign now lists a 2:00 rally in West Chester at the Savannah Center on Chappell Crossing Boulevard.  Tickets available here:

ORIGINAL STORY: 

A mid-day Sunday rally for presidential contender Donald J. Trump at the Duke Energy Convention Center has been called off.

Eric Deters, who was the Northern Kentucky chairman of the Trump campaign told WVXU that there were "some problems" with the Duke Energy Center that could not be worked out, but he said the campaign is still trying to schedule a rally with Trump in Cincinnati before Tuesday's primary election.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Donald J. Trump, locked in a critical battle for Ohio’s 66 Republican delegates in Tuesday’s primary election, will crisscross the state this weekend, including stops for both in Cincinnati.

Thursday morning, Linda Caudill, the Hamilton County chair of Trump’s campaign, said the campaign signed a contract “late last night” with the Duke Energy Convention Center to hold a Sunday rally.

She said she had no details on the rally but said they are expected to be released by the Trump campaign later today. This story will be updated.

  It’s really hard to deny now that, believe it or not, Donald Trump may be unstoppable in his march to the Republican presidential nomination.

Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, one of the five GOP contenders still standing, doesn’t think so, but it is really very hard to see the narrow path Kasich will have to trod to supplant Trump when the Republicans meet in Cleveland in July for their presidential nominating convention.

  John Kasich - who was re-elected as Ohio's governor  in 2014 with 64 percent of the vote - is trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump by five percentage points among likely Ohio GOP primary voters, according to a poll released Tuesday morning by Quinnipiac University. 

The Quinnipiac Poll had Trump with 31 percent support among Ohio Republicans, compared to 26 percent for Kasich. 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the challenges Ohio Gov. John Kasich faces over the next month in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination. 

WVXU-FM

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about what kind of field of candidates Ohio voters may face when they go to the polls March 15 for the Ohio presidential primary. 

  Ohio’s primary election is March 15; and, in southwest Ohio, there’s every reason to believe that both Democrats and Republicans will have good reasons to go to the polls (or vote early).

Let’s deal with the obvious one first, the one every Republican and Democratic voter in the state can help decide – a little thing we like to call the “presidential primary.”