Ohio voter purge

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State Still Tallying Figures In Latest Voter Purge

Sep 9, 2019

As many as 200,000 registrations may have been removed from the rolls by county boards of elections starting on Friday.

Today is the first day of early voting for the May primary – which means yesterday was the last day to register to vote. And though turnout in off-year primaries is especially low, there may be those who will try to vote but find they’ve been removed from the rolls. 

For the first time, the Secretary of State will send voter registration forms to hundreds of thousands of Ohioans who were removed from the voting rolls for not voting or updating their addresses with county boards of elections. And while it’s not expected many will be filled out and returned, one voting rights group says it’s a positive move.

Updated: 3:18 p.m.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted today announced that more than 275,000 notices of so-called "last-chance" mailings are being sent to voters by county boards across the state, part of what a release called "list maintenance processes" to keep voter records up-to-date.

The leader of the Ohio Democratic Party is calling out Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted for issuing an order on so-called voter purging just weeks before he leaves office. 

A federal appeals court has ruled that Ohioans who were removed for not voting over a six-year period must be allowed to vote in this midterm election.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is taking extra steps to clarify the state's process for clearing voter rolls, outlining some new initiatives aimed at helping voters stay up-to-date.

Ohio’s top Democratic elected official is fighting the state’s process when it comes to scratching voters off the rolls. The new bill is in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling approving Ohio’s voter roll cleanup process. 

ohio voter purge
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In Hamilton County – and in large urban counties all over Ohio – Republicans and Democrats have been arguing about the practice of purging voter rolls ever since Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted became Ohio's chief election officer in 2011.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

U.S. Supreme Takes Up Ohio Voter Purges

Jan 9, 2018
ANN THOMPSON / WVXU

Across the United States, government officials try to maintain accurate voter rolls by removing people who have died or moved away. Now, the U.S. Supreme Court is taking up a case that examines whether some states, including Ohio, are aggressively purging voter rolls in a way that disenfranchises thousands of voters. The justices will decide how far states can go in purging their election databases.

WVXU-FM

WVXU reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about expectations for the first presidential debate tonight; and about last week's ruling by the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals saying the purge of Ohio voter rolls is unconstitutional.