panhandling

Courtesy / City of Cincinnati

The five yellow donation stations in Downtown Cincinnati, installed as an alternative to giving money to panhandlers, haven't seen a lot of donations since they were installed about a year ago.

The Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC) reports between $300 to $350 has been collected from the re-purposed parking meters.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

After a federal judge blocks work requirements for Medicaid patients in Kentucky, Governor Matt Bevin cuts dental and vision coverage for about 460,000 low-income Kentuckians on Medicaid. Another judge denies Bevin's request to amend a court ruling on the state's pension plan. And Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announces he will run for governor in 2019.

The City of Cincinnati and downtown organizations propose a plan to reduce panhandling. And the Cincinnati Reds today look nothing like the team that took the field last April. What's going on?

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

Dayton City Commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance effectively banning panhandling along many major roadways in Dayton. 

The new law prohibits pedestrians from coming within three feet of an operating vehicle on 51 busy roadways in the city. It would also penalize motorists who slow down or deviate from traffic lanes to interact with pedestrians.

The City of Dayton is again exploring ways to ban panhandling along major city highways. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the city commission is expected to review an ordinance that would criminalize the practice.

Dayton first introduced legislation to restrict panhandling in 2011. That law required panhandlers to register with the city, and restricted begging to daylight hours. It also allowed cops to arrest violators instead of just citing them.

After legal challenges, the law was partially repealed in 2016.

Courtesy / City of Cincinnati

There are now five donation stations in downtown Cincinnati where people can give money to help the homeless population.  

The city along with Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated (DCI) and 3CDC are partnering for the effort.  

Cincinnati Council could vote in two weeks on a plan to forbid aggressive panhandling within 50 feet of a school.  

The Law and Public Safety Committee discussed the issue Monday but did not vote on the proposal.  

Panhandling and social service agencies in town

Jan 30, 2015

Panhandlers are an all-too-common sight in most large cities, including Cincinnati, and even though non-aggressive panhandling is legal here, it can be bothersome to visitors, residents and workers. And giving a panhandler money is not the best way to truly help the suffering. Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated recently launched a program to make people more aware of local agencies and services, such as the Winter Shelter, and how they better serve those in need. Joining us to talk about the Panhandling Education Program and helping the homeless in Cincinnati are Cincinnati Police Captain Mike Neville, David Ginsburg, president and CEO of Downtown Cincinnati Inc., and Kevin Finn, president and CEO of Strategies to End Homelessness.

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. is launching an effort to decrease panhandling while maintaining or increasing support to social services.  DCI president David Ginsburg says the group is publicizing agencies that try to get to the root of poverty.