Red Flag law

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Following the mass shooting that took place in Dayton, Ohio, Governor Mike DeWine proposed new gun regulations, including expanded background checks and a version of a "red flag law." 

That legislation is likely to be met with resistance in the Ohio House. Although Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is working hard to convince the governor and legislature to take action to reduce gun violence. 

Following the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, Congress is considering a bill that would encourage states to pass red flag laws. Members of Congress may want to study Florida, where it's been in place for a year and a half.

Since it was adopted there, courts have approved some 2,500 risk protection orders. That's nearly five every day, more than any other state. The Florida law allows police, acting with court approval, to temporarily seize weapons from people deemed to be at risk of harming themselves or others.

A new tool

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey.

A bipartisan group of Kentucky lawmakers has proposed a bill that would allow police or family members to ask a court to temporarily take guns away from people if they present a danger to themselves or others.

The recent spate of mass shootings, capped by the weekend tragedies in El Paso and Dayton, are bringing  new attention to so-called "red flag" laws.

Earlier this year, police dispatchers in Evansville, Indiana, received a chilling call. A man said he was holding his wife at knifepoint, and he warned police that he was heavily armed.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s deeply concerned about attacks at houses of worship, including at a synagogue in California this weekend. And that has him looking into a specific type of gun legislation that’s failed to move in the Republican dominated legislature before.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said he's open to discussing two high-profile gun laws when the General Assembly returns next year, the "Stand Your Ground" bill and the "red flag law." These two issues caused a rift among members of the House and Senate, along with Gov. John Kasich.

Ohio lawmakers are preparing to return to the Statehouse for what looks like a busy lame duck session. This is when legislators pass a slew of bills before the year ends. Gov. John Kasich is among the many state leaders preparing for what could be a big fight over hot button bills.