Redistricting

steve chabot
JOHN MINCHILLO / AP

By 2023, Ohio will have newly-redrawn congressional districts; and Hamilton County - now a blue county - would probably end up being a district by itself. Would that mean the end of the road for long-time Republican incumbent Steve Chabot? And what Democrats might run to replace him? WVXU's senior political analyst Howard Wilkinson spoke with Jay Hanselman about how redistricting in Hamilton County might shake out.

ohio congressional map
Wikimedia Commons

We're still almost two years away from the time when the numbers geeks hired by the political parties in Ohio put on their green eyeshades and load their U.S. Census data into their computers and begin turning out a brand-new congressional district map.

what color is ohio
Pixabay

You tell me if this makes sense.

Ohio has 16 congressional districts - for the moment, at least.

The only statewide issue on the May primary ballot nearly didn’t make it – though it’s been talked about for decades. There's a long history of the complicated Issue 1, which some activists call a historic effort to change the way the map of Ohio’s Congressional districts is created.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Statehouse News Bureau

Editor's note: This story was first published March 29, 2018. WVXU re-posts it here as a reminder of the deadline.

The registration to vote in Ohio’s primary on May 8 is quickly approaching.

Issue 1, the proposed redistricting plan, continues to rack up support ahead of its appearance on the May ballot. Although backers are optimistic it will pass, they’re not putting all of their eggs in this election’s basket.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

A former University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) professor is accused of sexual misconduct over two decades. Cincinnati City Council members engage in a Twitter dispute. The City Manager wants to delay responsible bidder regulations for city contractors. And Ohio voters are likely to see redistricting on the May ballot after a reform plan passes in the Ohio House.

There just seems to be something inherently unfair about how Ohio draws its congressional district lines, a process that, in 2011, was controlled by Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The first issue on the Ohio ballot was the first to be called, as it was apparent early on that voters were approving it overwhelmingly.

The Constitutional Modernization Commission had looked at various options for improving redistricting, a process that’s generally blamed for creating legislative and congressional districts that favor one party over another. 

The panel was very close to bringing a plan forward.  But now, two new bills have surfaced. Republican Representative Matt Huffman is the sponsor of these new plans.