refugees

Guatemala
Moises Castillo / AP

A University of Cincinnati space professor who studies everything from Mars to maps is taking a deeper look into why so many people are coming to the U.S. Twenty-five years of satellite maps show deforestation and subsequent climate change are driving migrants to leave Central America.

Deepa Halaharvi is a morning person.

"Eat, read, pray, and get ready to go to work," she says, laughing. "And usually I’m out the door around 6:15 or 6:30."

The Trump administration’s decision to lower the cap on refugees admitted into the U.S. is calling into question the future of refugee resettlement in Bowling Green. The administration announced Monday it’s reducing the refugee cap to a record low of 30,000. The International Center of Kentucky was planning to resettle about 400 refugees this year, but now it may not be able to bring in even half of that.  

The Bowling Green-based agency is a volunteer group that relies on federal funds to resettle refugees. With less refugees coming to Bowling Green, the International Center will have to cut back on staff and resources.

immigrant and refugee law center cincinnati
Immigrant and Refugee Law Center / Provided

Navigating our complex legal system can be a challenge, even more so for immigrants to this country. Barriers to understanding the legal system can include bridging language gaps and overcoming financial burdens.

Officer Damber Subba’s first shift Monday afternoon was patrolling familiar territory: Akron’s North Hill neighborhood. Here's more on the first-ever refugee sworn into Akron’s police force.

Like the other 11 rookie police officers sworn in Friday night, Damber Subba wore a deep blue uniform, his posture erect, steps precise, face serious. But before the evening was over, he was a half-dozen layers deep in brightly colored scarves and garlands of flowers.

Refugee Connect
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RefugeeConnect’s mission is to improve the lives of refugees in our region, to foster community acceptance and inclusion, and to construct a sustainable support system for the individuals and families who have made Greater Cincinnati their new home. Its goal is to make Cincinnati the most welcoming city in America for refugees.

Provided / Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio

One of four families blocked from entering the U.S. by the president's executive order on immigration arrived Wednesday in Cincinnati.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Jan. 27 suspending new refugee admissions for 120 days and blocking travelers from seven Muslim majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days. Syrian refugees are banned indefinitely.

Tana Weingartner/WVXU

 

This week, Mayor John Cranley declared Cincinnati a "sanctuary city," a designation with no strict legal definition. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU News

Sami Bdeir is worried about a new ban on travelers from seven Muslim majority countries. He's a Syrian refugee who came to Cincinnati about two years ago. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The White House plans to increase the number of refugees this fiscal year from 85,000 to 110,000. For Catholic Charities Southwest Ohio this 30 percent increase means another 100 people they will help find homes, learn English and get jobs. Since 1980 CCSWO has resettled more than 12,000 refugees. It's estimated there are between 12,000 and 25,000 living in Greater Cincinnati.

Local Students Aiding Refugees In Cincinnati

Oct 12, 2016
commons.wikimedia.org

Tens of thousands of refugees, who’ve fled from upheaval, violence and persecution in their countries, have made the Cincinnati area their new home. Though they’re coming here for a better life, the transition has it challenges. 

Walnut Hills High School senior Adam Sella is organizing a benefit concert for the school’s STAR (Students Together Assisting Refugees)

Provided

As part of a year-long integrated program, Xavier University will be examining immigration, migration and refugees. A group of Xavier faculty and staff, the Mission Animators, will provide extensive programming, to include various courses, film screenings, educational sessions and panels.

Wikipedia, available for use

Refugees are people who have fled their homelands due to war, persecution and political upheaval; there are as many as 12,000 to 25,000 refugees living in Greater Cincinnati, according to Junior League of Cincinnati. They come from all over the world, from Syria to Ethiopia to Vietnam.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

After the terror attacks in Paris last week, several U.S. Governors, including those in Ohio, Indiana, and the governor-elect of Kentucky, have said they don't want Syrian refugees settled in their states, citing security concerns.

Local Muslim groups are criticizing the statements.  

Connecting refugees with help

Nov 10, 2014
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According to estimates from the Junior League of Cincinnati, there are anywhere from 12,000 to 25,000 people living in the Cincinnati area who have fled their homes because of war or persecution.

But while conflicts rage on in the Middle East and Africa, don't look for an influx of refugees any time soon.  The resettlement process, through the United Nations and the State Department is a lengthy one.  It can take years to get out of a refugee camp and into a new home in a new country.