robots

Courtesy of Tengai Unbiased

Video job interviews are becoming the norm, especially during COVID-19. But there is some question as to how fairly you are evaluated in this medium.

Courtesy of Tengai

How would you feel about a robot interviewing you for a job? Swedish company Tengai is working on an English version of its robot which it claims will ask you questions without biases. Other companies, like HireVue and Humantic, formerly DeepSense, dig for personality traits based on digital interviews and social media accounts.

cobot
Courtesy of FANUC

In order to be globally competitive, Tri-State businesses big and small are increasing their use of robots. With reports like the one from The McKinsey Global Institute signaling workforce change, a Cincinnati futurist says the region should have a strategic plan involving local governments, corporations and educators.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Procter & Gamble says it plans to ramp up the number of robots it has to a total of 5,000 in the next five years. It now has 3,000, up from 1,000 in 2013. Managers say the reason for the robotic increase is due to advances in vision and gripping, as well as robots that can work alongside people.

Used with permission / Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

Starship Technologies

Ohio is now the fifth state in the nation to allow delivery robots on sidewalks. The Buckeye State joins Wisconsin, Florida, Virginia and Idaho where a robot the size of a large cooler can peacefully coexist with the public as it delivers take-out food, groceries, clothes, and more.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

DESĪN, with offices in Dayton and Michigan, is introducing  Obi™  the robotic dining companion.

For inventor Jon Dekar it was a very personal decade long project. While in high school volunteering, he watched the disabled struggle as well as his own grandfather who slowly lost the ability to feed himself. "You know, it's one of life's basic needs and it's also a fundamental freedom. It's a very intimate personal experience."

Knightscope

Robots are increasingly having to protect themselves from people after a rash of destructive incidents.

The behavior can come in the form of a loud screech, a polite request to get out of the way, or shivers, so people will feel sorry for them.

This is the robot with the loud screech, K5, who is currently patrolling malls, parking lots and schools.

Wikipedia

It may not be too long before your co-worker is a robot. That robot might eventually take your job, according to this video.

Robot Medics Research

Sep 14, 2012

Injured U.S. soldiers on the battlefield may eventually be helped by robots. Vision recognition technology developed by University of Dayton researchers would help the robots seek out and find soldiers in need of medical care.  Ann Thompson reports in this week's Focus on Technology.