sickle cell anemia

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Increasingly, sickle cell anemia patients in the U.S. are moving away from blood transfusions and instead using a medicine called Hydroxyurea to control their disease and eliminate the symptoms. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers are perfecting a technique that determines the correct dosage for each patient in one day.

Cincinnati Children's

Sickle cell patients face a lifetime of getting blood transfusions because there's no cure for the disease. It's a fact of life for brother and sister Taryn Walker, 14, and King Walker, 11, both students at the School for the Creative and Performing Arts.

High-Tech Shark Tank

May 11, 2015
Ann Thompson / WVXU

As part of the University of Cincinnati's Research Week, a friendly little "Shark Tank" competition brought out the brilliant and innovative scientists from UC and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Cincinnati Children's

In what's being called a "major advancement," Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and other researchers around the country say young sickle cell anemia patients have a safer way to manage their disease.

Russell Ware, MD PhD,director of Hematology at Cincinnati Children's says the standard of care is lifetime blood transfusions for those at risk of stroke. But a clinical trial shows the medicine hydroxyurea  is just as good as blood transfusions without the cost and side effects.