slavery

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Cincinnati Council may consider a proposal to change the name of a street just south of the University of Cincinnati's campus that carries the name of an enslaver. A council committee discussed the idea and the full council could take up the issue Wednesday.

UC Drops Enslaver McMicken's Name From College

Dec 17, 2019
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

The University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees voted unanimously to rename the College of Arts and Sciences Tuesday.

Founded On Slavery: How Does Higher Education Make Amends?

Oct 10, 2019
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati are studying how its institutions were built on slavery. Higher education representatives from across the country are in Cincinnati this week for "The Academy's Original Sin," a conference exploring the past and present racial inequities in higher education that date back to slavery. Enslavers founded both Xavier and UC, which are hosting the conference.

lower west end
Courtesy of Cincinnati Museum Center

The year 1619 is getting a lot of mentions lately, in large part because of the massive The 1619 Project undertaken by The New York Times. August marks 400 years since slavery began in America.

Harvard University Press

One of the cruel abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. But as Trinity College Associate Professor of English and American Studies Christopher Hager reveals in his latest book, “Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing,” some enslaved African Americans did learn to read and write, and during the early years of emancipation thousands more became literate.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation On Display

Sep 22, 2015

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Visitors at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center rang bells Thursday afternoon marking the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War. Staff and historical reenactors participated as well.

On or about April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the Appomattox Court House.

Provided, Freedom Center, by Farshid Assass, Assassi Productions

 A delegation from the Freedom Center met recently with activists in Greece, Lithuania and Romania, to talk about human trafficking.

Brooke Hathaway of the Freedom Center, who was among the three-member delegation, says they went to Eastern Europe to meet and thank the people who've been instrumental in combating human trafficking in those nations.  She says they wanted to learn from those people and to raise awareness of the problem back in the United States.