Stephen Colbert

Courtesy NBCUniversal

Friday April 17 update: The Rolling Stones were added Friday to the all-star One World: Together At Home eight-hour television and streaming special starting 8 p.m. Saturday.

Wednesday April 15 update: Taylor Swift, Alicia Keys, Jennifer Lopez, Usher, Sam Smith, Pharrell Williams and a dozen other stars have been added to the eight-hour One World: Together At Home coronavirus relief event starting 8 p.m. Saturday April 18 on multiple networks and streaming services.

And more big names will appear on a six-hour pre-show livestream, Billboard says.

NBCUniversal

Why do Jimmy Fallon and Conan O'Brien do fewer President Trump jokes than Stephen Colbert or Seth Meyers? Why aren't some late-night TV hosts very political?

John Kiesewetter

"How Late Night TV Made Fun Of Washington D.C. This Year"... That's the topic for former NBC executive Rick Ludwin's annual talk to Miami University students on Thursday, Oct. 19.

PBS

Ken Burns' highly anticipated look back at "The Vietnam War" premieres Sunday, Sept. 17, opposite the annual  Emmy Awards.

PBS devotes 18 hours to the film at 8 p.m. Sunday through Thursday for two weeks.

NBCUniversal

Jerry Seinfeld's “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" is on the move -- from Sony's Crackle streaming service to Netflix late this year, Variety says.

Tribune Broadcasting

Before we welcome 2016, let’s look back at this year in TV, movies, radio and media from A to Z.

Andy Chow

Ohio Gov. John Kasich brings his presidential campaign to CBS’ “Late Show with Stephen Colbert” on Friday.

Kasich follows Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders to Colbert’s two month old CBS show (11:35 p.m., Channel 12).

Also scheduled as Friday guests are Whoopi Goldberg and Irish songwriter Glen Hansard.

NBCUniversal

You’ll never watch Jimmy Fallon’s “Tonight Show” the same way after reading this column.

I always learn a lot about TV when former NBC late-night programming executive Rick Ludwin returns to speak to students at Miami University, his alma mater.

On Thursday night, he revealed NBC's camera tricks on Fallon’s top-rated “Tonight Show” to overcome limitations of cramped Studio 6B in New York’s Rockefeller Center – and a few other observations about Stephen Colbert and the changes in TV’s late-night landscape.

Wikipedia

Will Stephen Colbert on CBS’ new “Late Show” Sept. 8 be as funny as the self-important character Colbert played hosting Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report?”

He’s no dummy. He won six prime-time Emmys, two Peabody Awards and a Grammy for his satirical “Colbert Report” on Comedy Central from 2005 to 2014.  And if he’s not an immediate sensation – as Jimmy Fallon was replacing Jay Leno – I think he’s smart enough to figure it out in the first few months hosting the “Late Show with Stephen Colbert” (11:35 p.m., CBS, Channel 12).

It comes down to this: Will the real Colbert be as entertaining on CBS as the fake Colbert was on Comedy Central?

That’s the question I asked WKRC-TV’s Brad Johansen, who interviewed Colbert for Channel 12 promos on the air now and a story to air Tuesday night before Colbert’s premiere. (Have you seen the one where Colbert calls him “Brad So Handsome?”)

Provided by Comedy Central

If you’re recording Jon Stewart’s last “The Daily Show” at 11 p.m. Thursday, set the DVR for an hour. Comedy Central’s schedule plans for at least a 50-minute farewell for Stewart, who’s leaving the show after 16 years.

Before Stewart says goodbye, Comedy Central will air a 12-hour marathon Thursday, starting with a repeat of Monday’s show with Amy Schumer (10:28 a.m. Thursday) and Tuesday’s show with Denis Leary (11:01 a.m.).

The reruns shows with Steve Carell (1:17 p.m.), Newt Gingrich (4:38 p.m.), Bill O’Reilly (5:38 p.m.), President Barack Obama (7:20 p.m.) and a special called “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: News Your Own Adventure” (8:56 p.m.). 

Provided by Comedy Central

Call him a comedian, call him a political satirist, call him an unabashed liberal. But to me, Jon Stewart is arguably the most influential comedian of our time.

Stewart leaves “The Daily Show” (11 p.m., Comedy Central) Thursday after 16 years with 19 Emmys for his blistering satires and holding politicians accountable. He turned a late-night comedy show originally hosted by former ESPN anchor Craig Kilborn (1996-98) into Must See TV, skewering politicians on the right and left. He wasn’t afraid to argue with President Barack Obama, members of congress or political commentators.

Here’s his final guest list: