tornado

Several victims of the tornadoes that moved through the Miami Valley on Memorial Day have received notices from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that they were overpaid disaster relief funds.

The agency says a total of six individuals, so far, have received notices of potential overpayment.

A fund set up to help survivors of the Memorial Day tornadoes has so far raised nearly $1 million. The Dayton Foundation’s Greater Dayton Disaster Relief Fund reports roughly half that amount has already been distributed to Miami Valley nonprofits assisting with recovery.

It’s been a month since the Memorial Day tornadoes cut a wide path of destruction across the Miami Valley.

Damage assessments continue, but the latest numbers already show roughly 5,700 Montgomery County properties were damaged in the storm. Hundreds more homes and businesses were affected across Mercer and Greene Counties.

It’s still unclear exactly how many residents remain displaced. And, Dayton-area advocates want more people affected by the tornadoes to come forward for FEMA assistance.

Additional Federal Emergency Management Agency disaster recovery centers are expected to open Wednesday in Beavercreek and Celina to assist people in Greene and Mercer Counties affected by the Memorial Day tornadoes. 

Another is expected to open soon in Eastern Ohio this week as well.
 

The centers will be staffed by federal experts from FEMA and the United States Small Business Administration to offer storm survivors assistance with temporary living expenses, uninsured home repairs, and other urgent needs.

The first of several FEMA disaster recovery centers opens Saturday in Trotwood. 

Agents from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the United States Small Business Administration will be on hand at the center to help survivors of the Memorial Day tornadoes with information about disaster assistance. 

The Trotwood center will be open to Miami Valley homeowners, renters and small-business owners affected by the storm, and include experts from Ohio, and Dayton-area agencies to help connect survivors with the services they need to get back on their feet.

The 10 Ohio counties impacted by the Memorial Day tornado outbreak are now eligible for federal disaster recovery aid. Dayton-area officials say the FEMA and other funding could play a crucial role in the Miami Valley’s ongoing recovery.

President Donald Trump issued a federal disaster declaration Tuesday, one week after Gov. Mike DeWine formally requested it.

The declaration means affected Ohioans are now eligible for aid through FEMA’s individual assistance, hazard mitigation, and disaster legal services programs.

Cleanup continues in many neighborhoods hard hit by a series of tornadoes on Memorial Day.  Montgomery County officials are striving to recycle as much of the debris as possible rather than send it directly to landfills.

Most yard waste and untreated scrap wood can be turned into mulch when brought to the Montgomery County Solid Waste Transfer and Recycling Facility in Moraine where it is ground up on-site and delivered to local companies to sell as mulch.

“I want my people to come back home, because the city of Trotwood is a family."

That's what one speaker told a large group of individuals and organizations that have, for almost two weeks now, focused on recovery efforts in the aftermath of a tornado outbreak that cause massive damage this past Memorial Day.

The gathering took place Friday at Sinclair Community College where the groups involved assessed the work they've done so far, and discussed how to take their recovery efforts to the next level.

When storms ravaged parts of Ohio during Memorial Day weekend, several libraries were forced to close their doors for a short time. Those facilities are back in operation. And many libraries are serving in relief efforts now.

Miami Valley officials are only beginning to calculate the longterm impacts of the devastation from last week’s tornado outbreak. Key is an investigation by FEMA to determine whether Ohio is eligible for emergency aid.

Officials caution it’s a complicated process that will take time. To see it in action, WYSO’s April Laissle followed one FEMA team into a particularly hard-hit area of Trotwood.

At the Westbrook Village Apartment Complex, a group of FEMA investigators walk through muddy grass holding clipboards, taking stock of what’s left.

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Jim Nolan / WVXU

This week FEMA investigators are in Ohio trying to assess the damage caused by tornadoes that hit the state Memorial Day. The National Weather Service confirmed 21 tornadoes struck in the state, damaging thousands of homes, apartments and commercial buildings.

It’s been a week since the Memorial Day tornado outbreak left a path of widespread devastation across the Miami Valley and dozens of tornado-affected businesses in Greene County and Montgomery County are still struggling to resume their normal operations. City and county officials have been out canvassing hard-hit areas in an effort to assess the extent of the storm’s economic impacts.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Greater Cincinnati Water Works has a back-up plan in case of disaster. In fact, the water district has several redundancies either ready to go or are nearing completion.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

So far, the National Weather Service has confirmed at least 17 tornadoes touched downed in Ohio Monday night. Dayton, Brookville, Trotwood, Celina and other areas suffered severe damage.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Businesses in and around Dayton are still dealing with a lack of electricity and water, after Monday night's tornadoes. Rahn's Artisan Breads stopped operations Monday night when the lights went out. Owner Rahn Keucher says his ovens run on electricity, and he hasn't been able to find a generator powerful enough to run his freezers and ovens.

Gov. Mike DeWine has declared a state of emergency in three Ohio counties after spending the day surveying the damage left behind by tornadoes and severe storms. 

dayton tornado
John Minchillo / AP

The lead time Dayton area residents had before a series of tornadoes touched down Monday and Tuesday varied. Dayton's Fire Chief praised the advanced warning from the National Weather Service (NWS) while some residents say they got word just moments before the storm hit.

dayton tornado
John Minchillo / AP

Communities are cleaning up after severe storm damage across the Dayton region late Monday into Tuesday morning. Mercer County officials report at least one person is dead in Celina. Images show leveled homes, debris-strewn roadways and destruction.

Updated at 12:41 p.m. ET

Several tornadoes touched down in highly populated areas of Dayton and other Ohio communities late Monday night, causing catastrophic damage. The storms devastated dozens of buildings and trees. One death has been reported, officials said Tuesday morning.

Dayton officials say results are expected soon from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality tests in the wake of Monday's tornadoes.

A boil advisory remains in effect for many parts of Montgomery County until further notice.

At a press conference Tuesday, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says residents in affected areas can pick up free bottled water, ice and other assistance from multiple locations in the city. 

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