UC College of Nursing

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According to local service agency Shelterhouse, almost 8,000 Cincinnatians, including children, are homeless. A variety of factors can lead to homelessness, including mental illness, drug addiction, traumatic events and personal crisis.

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While stress is a normal part of office life, too much of it can be counterproductive and cause serious problems. 

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The practice of nursing has evolved dramatically since the 1970s. Nurses have long been at the forefront of patient care, and changes in demographics, technology and our healthcare systems during the last 50 years have required nurses to take on an even greater role in patient treatment and health management.

How To Manage Stress

Apr 7, 2016
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We all experience stress from time to time, whether in the workplace or at home, but how much is too much? Stress can have a negative impact on our minds and bodies; too much of it can cause diseases such as depression, anxiety and heart attack. According to the American Psychological Association, one in three Americans report experiencing extreme stress.
 

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The Ebola outbreak that began in West Africa early last year killed more than 5,000 people, making it the worst outbreak of the virus in history, according to the World Health Organization. And for the first time ever, the United States had to confront the disease here at home. While the US news is no longer filled with stories about Ebola, and no cases have been reported here this year, Ebola is still a very real threat in West Africa.

  Thanks to high-definition cameras, monitors and advances in communications technology, and driven by a growing shortage of physicians, telehealth is quickly growing in use and popularity. It allows a patient to consult with a healthcare provider remotely instead of traveling to an office or clinic, and the costs involved are usually much less than a traditional office visit. Joining us to look at how telehealth is helping to change the practice of medicine are Dr. Debi Sampsel, chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing; Pam Kimmel, director of telehealth for UC Health; and, Megan Gresham, director of corporate communications with Maple Knoll Village.