UC Health

uc doctors
Courtesy of UC Health

Cincinnati Edition speaks with UC Health researchers Dr. Aaron Grossman, assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Rehabilitative Medicine and a UC Health physician; and Dr. Matthew Smith, a neuro-critical care fellow and UC Health physician; about their just-completed report that offers guidelines for providing lifesaving treatment to stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Courtesy of UC Health

Cincinnati Edition speaks with Dr. Evaline Alessandrini, the chief medial officer of UC Health, about the process of resuming elective surgeries and other procedures that were halted during the pandemic more than a month ago and the new COVID-19 testing capabilities that are now in place.

rob portman
John Minchillo / AP

Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) helped surmount bureaucratic and political obstacles to help UC Heath get a critical piece of testing equipment for their laboratory that would expand testing for the novel coronavirus.

Courtesy of Roche

Ohio has a shortage of tests and the ability to test for COVID-19. Southwest Ohio is particularly lacking in ability to diagnose patients. Sen. Rob Portman and UC Health say help is on the way.

Courtesy / UC Health

Updated Friday, 10:00 a.m.

On Tuesday, UC Health began offering drive-thru screening and testing for COVID-19, but only with a doctor's referral. On Wednesday, the hospital issued a statement announcing it would limit drive-thru testing to the "most urgent and critical needs."

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Research shows South Asians are four times more likely to develop heart disease than the rest of the population. One University of Cincinnati scientist is moving beyond genetics to talk about risk and prevention.

Courtesy of UC Health

UC Health will spend $221 million to remodel and update its Clifton facilities. The five-year plan will extend across the 14-acre campus.

uc data breach
Pixabay

UC Health says it is investigating an email phishing incident that may have compromised some patient information.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A promising new cancer drug developed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and manufactured by Bexion Pharmaceuticals in Covington will soon be tested on children. BXQ-350 is already showing signs it's working on adults who have brain and gastrointestinal tumors.

uptown innovation rendering
Provided / University of Cincinnati

"All of Uptown could be called an innovation district, because of all the research that goes on here," says Uptown Consortium CEO Beth Robinson. Maybe so, but construction for the defined project will soon be underway.

Courtesy of UC Health

The University of Cincinnati Medical Center (UCMC) performed 303 organ transplants in nearly 300 surgeries last year, setting a new record.

mammography
Damian Dovarganes / AP

A study comparing the effectiveness of 3D versus 2D mammography is enrolling participants in Greater Cincinnati.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A UC Health cardiologist is studying whether the Orthodox Jewish practice of wearing tefillin, a tight leather band strapped around the arm and worn during 30 minutes of daily prayer, can protect against heart damage. A pilot study suggests it might.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Some lung cancer nodules are very small and undetectable until they grow larger, and that can signal a poor prognosis for the patient. Even if they are discovered at an early stage, finding them during surgery can be challening. But UC Health is seeing success detecting and marking the nodules with a procedure using radioactive material and a special probe that acts as a Geiger counter.

kidney cancer
Bruce Blaus Blausen.com staff/Medical gallery of Blausen Medical 2014

The American Cancer Society estimates 65,340 new cases of kidney cancer (42,680 in men and 22,660 in women) will occur this year. About 14,970 people (10,010 men and 4,960 women) will die from the disease. Kidney cancer is among the 10 most common cancers in both men and women.

cincinnati edition
Wikipedia

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows diseases transmitted through the bites of ticks, mosquitoes and fleas are a "growing public health problem" in the United States, with reported cases of what are called vector-borne diseases more than tripling nationwide since 2004.   

Pixabay

Crackling sounds deep inside the brain signal normal communication among an estimated 100 billion neurons. But after a traumatic health event like a brain injury or a heart attack, the brain goes silent. If the patient isn't revived, a massive wave of electrochemical energy is released that gradually poisons the nerve cells.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

UC researchers have figured out a way to non-invasively peek inside the brain of a neurological intensive care patient to stop the deadliest form of stroke, an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). They say this is important because the person is often sedated, sometimes on a ventilator and cannot communicate.

Doctors Matthew Flaherty, Opeolu Adeoye, George Shaw and Joe Clark became frustrated that CT and MRI scans were the only option and couldn't be done repeatedly. Shaw tells the story.

Boot Camp For New Dads

Jun 7, 2017
Pixabay

When you bring home a new baby the first few months are a test of endurance and strength. It's almost as if you need a boot camp before you're ready for all that parenthood hurls at you. For new fathers, part of the challenge can be in figuring out how to provide support for mom. But fathers need support as well.

Grace Project

The loss of a woman's breasts to cancer can take an emotional and psychological toll and affect how she views herself as a woman. Photographer Charise Isis founded the Grace Project to empower women who have had mastectomies, creating portraits showing the strength and beauty of cancer survivors.

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