WKRC-TV

Courtesy WKRC-TV

Longtime WKRC-TV anchor Cammy Dierking has told her bosses she's leaving the station at the end of her contract in December, multiple sources tell me.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

For a fourth consecutive year, WKRC-TV will telecast the annual Western & Southern/WEBN-FM Riverfest fireworks at 9 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 1.

Courtesy WKRC-TV

Wednesday 10:45 a.m. June 19 update:  WKRC-TV General Manager Jon Lawhead says the station wanted anchor Rob Braun "to stay, but he decided it was time to move on."  The station is starting "an immediate search – both internal and external – to find our next main evening anchor," Lawhead said.

As I reported yesterday, Braun told the newsroom Monday he was leaving WKRC-TV after 35 years when his contract expires June 28. WKRC-TV posted a story Wednesday morning with these comments from Lawhead:

Courtesy Fox Sports Ohio

Fox Sports Ohio soon could be owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group, the nation's largest TV station owner and operator of WKRC-TV, WSTR-TV, WKEF-TV and WRGT-TV in Southwestern Ohio.

tv's new face
Pxhere

What happened to Barak Shapiro? Where's Aly Cohen? How will WLW-TV fill Lisa Cooney's anchor job? And who are all these new TV reporters on Cincinnati newscasts?

Before May ratings' sweeps start Thursday, here's a look at the major changes and new faces on TV since last May:

Jerry Springer's new fall court show will air on WSTR-TV (Channel 64), which broadcast his daytime talk show for years.

Courtesy WKRC-TV

Former WKRC-TV news anchor Brad Johanson is gone from WRAL-TV in Raleigh, N.C., after one year.

"There was a personnel matter and we handled it immediately," said Joel Davis, WRAL-TV general manager, in an email to the News & Observer. "Brad Johansen is no longer with the station."

tim hedrick
John Kiesewetter / WVXU

On this date: Cincinnati's second television station, WKRC-TV, debuted as Channel 11 on April 4, 1949. It moved to Channel 12 on Oct. 20, 1952 as part of the nationwide TV frequency realignment.

The Taft family owned the station, and until 1960 it broadcast from the Tafts' Cincinnati Times-Star evening newspaper office at 800 Broadway downtown. That's where Rod Serling did his first TV drama, The Storm, and comedian Soupy Sales (known here as Soupy Hines) did his show in the early 1950s.

John Kiesewetter

Top of the ninth inning. Bases loaded. Reds up 5-3. Game on the line.

So why did WKRC-TV cut away from the Opening Day game to air CBS coverage of the NCAA tournament? Talk about March madness.

John Kiesewetter

Play ball! Fox Sports Ohio's Opening Day plans again call for the 4:10 p.m. Thursday game to be simulcast on WKRC-TV (Channel 12).

WCPO-TV, WLWT-TV, WXIX-TV and WKRC-TV will provide extensive Opening Day coverage on their morning newscasts. All four stations, plus FSO and CitiCable, will air and stream the noon parade.

Courtesy WKRC-TV

UPDATE AT 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 28:  Jeff Hirsh's coworkers praise him for being able to do it all. And he did.

In 40 years of Cincinnati television – 21 years at WKRC-TV after 19 years at WLWT-TV – he did breaking news; features; live shots; taped packages; stories about long, tedious court trials and complicated government issues; and wrote and produced several one-hour documentaries.

WVXU file

Dan Hurley is good at many things – except retiring. He's failed at it several times, due to his sense of civic responsibility and love for broadcasting.

Maybe this time he can finally kick back after hosting his last Cincinnati Edition talk show 1 p.m. Friday on WVXU-FM. He's been the "three-month interim host" for nearly a year. Michael Monks takes over Monday, Feb. 4, when the show resumes broadcasting five days a week.

Courtesy WCPO-TV

Reporter Tom McKee and sportscaster Ken Broo -- who roomed together as WCPO-TV interns in the summer of 1973 -- will both retire this month from Channel 9.

Together they've spent 67 years on Cincinnati television – 40 for McKee and 27 for Broo.

Courtesy NBCUniversal

It's official: Jerry Springer, whose daytime talk show ceased production last spring, will debut next fall as TV's Judge Jerry, and likely air on Cincinnati television.

In late October, I reported that Springer – the former Cincinnati attorney, mayor and news anchor turned TV talk host – had taped a TV court show pilot for NBCUniversal, which produced and distributed the Jerry Springer talk show, which ended production earlier this year.

Courtesy Sam Straley

Sam Straley was walking around the Los Angeles studio for his ABC sitcom, The Kids Are Alright, when he saw a poster for Milk Money, the 1994 Melanie Griffith film shot in Cincinnati.

He smiled and looked heavenward.

"That's my grandpa saying 'Hey!' " Straley says.

Courtesey Brad Maushart

Look for another change in the weather in December, as Cincinnati and Indianapolis swap meteorologists.

University Press of Mississippi

Author Nick Parisi talks to me about Rod Serling's early 1950s TV scripts, and how they shaped his  writing for The Twilight Zone and other network TV shows, on Around Cincinnati 7 p.m. Sunday Oct. 28 on WVXU-FM and WMUB-FM.

Courtesy Deb Dixon

Retired TV reporter Deb Dixon will be honored for her decades of police reporting, and helping "Cincinnati become a safe place for all of us to live and work," by the Matt Haverkamp Foundation Nov. 13 at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel.

Courtesy University Press of Mississippi

Author Nick Parisi calls it "a storm in Cincinnati."  His new comprehensive look at Rod Serling's TV scripts includes the most detailed examination I've ever seen on Serling's drama scripts for The Storm on Cincinnati's WKRC-TV in 1951-52, eight years before CBS debuted his iconic The Twilight Zone.

When WKRC-TV reporter Larry Davis retired in July after 35 years covering Cincinnati news – a month after Deb Dixon retired after 44 years at the station  – I posed the question: Are we witnessing a changing of the guard at Channel 12, the station with Cincinnati's most veteran reporting staff?

Today the answer is: Yes, definitely.

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