WNOP-AM

Verve Records

Some know comedian Shelley Berman from his Emmy-nominated role as Larry David's father on "Curb Your Enthusiasm." Others will remember him as old Judge Sanders on "Boston Legal," or his guest roles on "L.A. Law."

But loyal WNOP-AM listeners will remember the iconic 1960s comedian - who died Friday at 92 at his California home of complications from Alzheimer's - from the station identification spots he recorded for the Newport jazz station that aired bits from comedy albums.

Provided / Jim LaBarbara

After nearly four decades on Cincinnati radio, DJ Jim LaBarbara has left the airwaves to enter politics.

Sacred Heart Radio

Northern Kentucky University is selling Middletown's WPFB-AM (910) to Sacred Heart Radio, the Catholic station broadcasting on WNOP-AM (740).

The Middletown AM station, which reaches north of Dayton and west of Oxford, will allow Sacred Heart Radio "to cover all the major cities in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. It's a monster signal during the day," says Bill Levitt, general manager. 

WVXU

You just know that jazz expert Oscar Treadwell is smiling on Cincinnati.

Ten years after his death, his adopted hometown provides the background for a major motion picture about jazz icon Miles Davis, Don Cheadle’s new "Miles Ahead."

Treadwell, who died on April 1, 2006, at age 79, was the jazz voice and conscience for Cincinnati for 46 years.  

If a Miles Davis tune was heard on radio here, most likely it was on Treadwell's shows on WVXU-FM, WNOP-AM, WGUC-FM, WVAE-FM or WZIP-AM. In fact, "O.T." is such an institution that his shows are still on the air here at WVXU-FM 10 p.m.-midnight Sunday.

WVXU

On New Year’s Eve 15 years ago, Cincinnati jazz lovers weren’t celebrating. They were about to lose their favorite station, WNOP-AM, which last broadcast jazz on Dec. 31, 2000.

For 40 years, the crazy little station filled the airwaves with Duke Ellington, Dave Brubeck, Oscar Peterson, Wes Montgomery, Buddy Rich, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and other jazz giants.

It was unlike any other station in Cincinnati – or possibly the nation. Who else broadcast from three huge oil tanks welded together, floating on the Ohio River on the Newport shore.

They called it “The Jazz Ark.”

Provided by family

While on a break at the Evendale General Electric plant in 1957, Walter E. Scott wrote the country song “Burning Bridges” which would be sung  by Glen Campbell, George Jones, Roger Miller and Ray Price.

More than 60 artists recorded the song by Scott, a Colerain Township resident who died Aug. 15 at age 89. Campbell released an album titled "Burning Bridges" in 1967.