work requirements

Advocates are worried about the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, which the state got permission to impose earlier this year.

A few dozen people stand on Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis to protest the state’s new work requirements. “Hoosier healthcare is under attack,” a protester yells through a megaphone. “What do we do? Stand up fight back.” 

A US District Court judge has thrown out Medicaid work requirements in two states, saying they are arbitrary and capricious.  Ohio is now reviewing its plan to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion, which was just approved by the federal government two weeks ago.

For a second time in nine months, the same federal judge has struck down the Trump administration's plan to force some Medicaid recipients to work to maintain benefits.

If Kentucky implements new Medicaid rules this summer, hospitals could see their revenue drop by 20 percent.  That’s according to an analysis of hospital finances in states that have approved or pending Medicaid waiver applications. 

According to estimates, about 95,000 Kentuckians over five years could lose health coverage if the state implements Medicaid rules that would require most recipients to work, attend school, or volunteer as a condition of receiving benefits. 

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  The state’s Medicaid director has put a number on how many people might be affected – and how much it might cost to put those requirements in place.

The federal government says Ohio can require non-disabled Medicaid expansion recipients to work 20 hours a week unless they’re caregiving, in job training or college or over 50. One state lawmaker is disappointed, because he wanted that age limit to be higher.

The federal government says Ohio can join the eight other states that have been given permission to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion.