Democrats

wisconsin voting
Morry Gash / AP

Wisconsin's governor tried and failed to stop the in-person voting from taking place Tuesday because of concerns over spreading the COVID-19 virus. The polls opened in Wisconsin Tuesday and it was a wreck, with the majorty of inside poll workers refusing to work because of fear of catching the virus. It made many people in Ohio glad Ohio canceled its March 17 Election Day and extended absentee balloting until April 28.

hyland mcfarlin
Courtesy

For someone like me, who has been covering politics in the Cincinnati area for nearly 40 years, I had something that was very much like an out-of-body experience at the historic Little Red School House in Indian Hill on Sunday.

2020 presidential candidates
From top L-R: Emily Prechti; Gage Skidmore (2); Wikimedia; AP; Phil Roeder; Wikimedia; Courtesy

No one can accuse Ohio's newly re-elected U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of letting the moss grow under his feet.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with city hall reporter Jay Hanselman this morning about the results of of last Tuesday's election in Hamilton County. One thing was obvious: Hamilton is now a blue county. Every Democratic statewide candidate - for governor, secretary of state, attorney general, treasuer and auditor - lost statewide, but every one of them won Hamilton County by a sizeable margin. Democrats defeated several incumbent Republican judges.

WVXU-FM

A report last week that the federal deficit had grown to $779 billion - and could grown another $1 trillion over the next 10 years - has become a contentious issue in the battle betweeen Democrats and Republicans for control  of Congress. WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the Democrats blaming the deficit on the Trump tax cuts; and the GOP defending them for already putting more money in the pockets of American workers. 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Directory Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the impact the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court might have on the mid-term elections, which are about a month away. Will it energize woman and more Democrats to come to the polls; or will it rebound in the favor of Republicans, giving their candidates a boost. 

Until recently former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray had been stuck in political limbo for what seemed like an eternity, unable, by federal law, to even hint at his ambition to be Ohio's next governor.

The Grove City Democrat was serving as the first director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), with a six-year term that was to have expired in June 2018.

The Hatch Act, which prohibits most federal employees from engaging in partisan politics, kept Cordray quiet about his ambitions, even though everyone in Ohio knew he had them burning inside him.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about the debate among the four announced Democratic candidates for Ohio governor Tuesday night; and how the possible entry of Richard Cordray and/or Jerry Springer might upset the apple cart. 

It's too early to tell if this is an advantage or a disadvantage, but it is a fact:

The field of Republican candidates for the 2018 Ohio gubernatorial election are generally better known than their Democratic counterparts.

WVXU

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about the challenges the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee would face in taking on Republican incumbent Steve Chabot in Ohio's First Congressional District. 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the large number of Democrats coming out to run for Congress and Cincinnati City Council. Could the election of Donald Trump last fall be fueling this surge in Democrats running for office? 

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Former state representative Connie Pillich of Montgomery has been laying the groundwork for months and, Monday morning, she made it official – she will be a Democratic candidate for Ohio governor in 2018.

She becomes the third Democrat to announce as a candidate for governor in 2018, joining former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton of Copley and Ohio Senate Minority Leader Joe Schiavoni of Boardman.

Democratic voters in the 31st Ohio House District have no less than six candidates from which to choose to replace incumbent Democrat Denise Driehaus, who is term-limited out of the Ohio House this year.

There is but one lone Republican on the primary ballot.

This should tell you something about the 31st – it is a heavily Democratic district.

In fact, the 31st Ohio House District was something of a gift that the Ohio Apportionment Board, controlled by Republicans, gave Democrats after the legislative district were re-drawn following the 2010 Census.