Federal Communications Commission

WVXU photo

Tuesday July 23 update: Work resumes this week on WCPO-TV's tower -- from which Cincinnati Public Radio broadcasts -- requiring WVXU-FM and WGUC-FM to reduce power for the crew's safety. The work will take two or three weeks.

Original post Friday July 19: Work on WCPO-TV's tower – from which Cincinnati Public Radio broadcasts – will require WVXU-FM and WGUC-FM to reduce power starting at about noon today, and may requiring switching to a back-up antenna that has a smaller reach.

Courtesy Block Broadcasting

Elliott Block's low-power Channel 25 – branded as "WKRP TV" – switched frequencies on Nov. 1, leading some over-the-air viewers to think the station had gone off the air.

Not true.

And even better news: Block has secured a permanent digital channel to remain on the air after most Cincinnati TV stations change digital channels sometime in 2019.

Time Warner Cable

A decision by the Federal Communications Commission on the $55-billion purchase of Time Warner Cable could be coming soon, according to a Multichannel News story citing a Wall Street Journal report.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is "likely to circulate an order" approving the acquisition by St. Louis-based Charter Communications, says Multichannel news.

Clyde Haehnle collection

Cincinnati’s first radio station celebrates its 94th birthday today in the midst of a fight with the federal government for WLW-AM to keep its nighttime 50,000-watt power reaching 38 states.

On this date in TV Kiese history, March 2, 1922, Cincinnati industrialist Powell Crosley Jr. started what would become known as the “Nation’s Station.” It has operated on 50,000 watts around the clock since 1943, when the government ended its 500,000-watt “super power” experiment.

But some day you no longer will be able to listen to the “Big One” and Reds games on radio while in Florida, New York, Chicago or Atlanta (as I have), if the Federal Communications Commission gets its way.