Larry Nager

Longtime music journalist and historian Larry Nager is returning to Cincinnati to speak at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County as part of Miami Regionals Appalachian Studies project. 

WVXU-FM repeats a one-hour interview Saturday with Cincinnati filmmaker Steve Gebhardt, who died Oct. 15 at his Cincinnati home. He was 78.

After founding and directing the University of Cincinnati Film Society in the 1960s, Gebhardt directed films for John Lennon and Yoko Ono and produced the “Ladies and Gentlemen, The Rolling Stones” concert documentary in the 1970s. He also produced “Bill Monroe: Father of Bluegrass Music” in 1993 with former Enquirer music writer Larry Nager.

His credits include “John Lennon Live in New York City,” “Imagine,” “Gimme Some Truth: The Making Of John Lennon’s Imagine Album,” “John Lennon and Yoko Ono Present the One-To-One Concert,” “Gotta Serve Somebody: The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan,” and the short films “Fly” and “Freedom” by Lennon and Ono, according to the International Movie Datebase.

Larry Nager

During the month of September, the legendary recording studio King Records will be celebrated across Cincinnati with various programs.  Beginning on Saturday evening, August 29th at 11pm here on WVXU/WMUB, the King Records salute gets underway with the first of five programs dedicated to the musicians who recorded at King Records on Brewster Avenue.

The five King Records specials on WVXU:

One-time Cincinnati journalist Larry Nager is the man behind the upcoming PBS special Rock My Soul, a salute to the people, history, and influence of gospel music, featuring archival footage, interviews and new, live performances. Lee Hay recently spoke with Larry Nager about his love of gospel music and the process of bringing this special to life. (The special airs on KET2 on March 8 at 11:30pm and March 13 at 5:30pm and on CET Arts March 6 at 8:00pm.)

Courtesy of Getty Images

For years, a lot of people who live in the Cincinnati area knew to pay attention to what Larry Nager was saying. Whether it was a concert review, a profile of a musician or news about upcoming record releases, people might spend money, sometimes lots of it, based on what he wrote -- first, for the afternoon paper, the Post, then for the "winner" in the battle for print allegiance, the Enquirer.