Bernie Sanders

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is asking his supporters and other Democrats to spend the next several days working to make sure Republican Donald Trump is not the next president.  

The former Democratic candidate is now supporting Hillary Clinton.  

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinon talked with Tana Weingartner Monday about the challenges Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face within their own parties. Clinton is anxiously waiting for Sen. Bernie Sanders to formally end his campaign and tell his millions of supporter to vote for Clinton, while Donald Trump is apparently going to be the nominee of a party where many top GOP leaders are saying they can't support his candidacy.

  Thursday night, Bernie Sanders looked into a TV camera and spoke for 23 minutes to approximately 220,000 of his most fervent supporters via a live-stream feed.

The Vermont senator, who rallied millions of voters to his cause during the primary and caucus season, said many things during his 23 minutes.

Except the one thing that Hillary Clinton and her supporters were hoping to hear:

I will vote for Hillary Clinton for president of the United States and I urge all of my supporters to do the same.

There can be no denying the historic nature of the moment in late July when Hillary Clinton steps to the podium at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia to become the first woman nominated by a major party as its presidential candidate.

"I'm grateful that it is happening in my lifetime,'' said Kathy Helmbock, a Clinton supporter and a long-time activist in feminist organizations such as the National Organization for Women and the Cincinnati Women's Political Caucus.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about Tuesday's Ohio presidential primary and how it will make or break Ohio Gov. John Kasich's bid for the GOP nomination. That's why Donald Trump is working hard to stop Kasich in Ohio. 

  John Kasich - who was re-elected as Ohio's governor  in 2014 with 64 percent of the vote - is trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump by five percentage points among likely Ohio GOP primary voters, according to a poll released Tuesday morning by Quinnipiac University. 

The Quinnipiac Poll had Trump with 31 percent support among Ohio Republicans, compared to 26 percent for Kasich. 

U.S. Senate/U.S. State Department

Ohio Democrats will gather in all 16 of the state’s congressional districts Tuesday night to select delegate and alternate slates for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Ohio’s March 15 primary election.

Ohio Republicans don’t use the caucus system to select delegates at the congressional district level – the campaigns of all 11 GOP candidates who have qualified for the March primary ballot have already been named by their campaigns and filed with the Ohio Secretary of State’s office.

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  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Hillary Clinton's rocky road to the Democratic presidential nomination and if there are any potential challengers out there who could take it away from her. 

U.S. Senate

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Sanders would physically be in Cincinnati. He will, in fact, be live-streaming the event to multiple venues nationwide. 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders will bring his campaign to Cincinnati Wednesday, July 29, when he live-streams a message to supporters at the Woodward Theater in Over-the-Rhine.