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0000017a-3b40-d913-abfe-bf44a4f90000Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU news team as the politics reporter and columnist in April 2012 , after 30 years of covering local, state and national politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. On this page, you will find his weekly column, Politically Speaking; the Monday morning political chats with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik and other news coverage by Wilkinson. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio gubernatorial race since 1974, as well as 16 presidential nominating conventions. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots, the Lucasville prison riot in 1993, the Air Canada plane crash at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983, and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. And, given his passion for baseball, you might even find some stories about the Cincinnati Reds here from time to time.

Sixty-two people to be dropped from voter rolls

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Howard Wilkinson
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Hamilton County Board of Elections

Sixty-two people will be stricken from the Hamilton County voter rolls because they did not respond to a board of elections letter challenging their voting addresses.

They include police officers, people who used postal service and private mail boxes, and some who voted from a motor coach association in Newtown.

Last August, the Hamilton County Board of Elections voted to send letters to ninety-two persons who were determined to be registered at improper addresses telling them to update their addresses or their voter registrations would be canceled. Ohio law requires voters to cast ballots from the address where they live.

Thirty of the voters who received the letter updated their voting addresses.

The vote Tuesday morning to drop the 62 voters from the rolls was unanimous and bipartisan.

Many of the voting address irregularities were brought to the board of Elections' attention by the Ohio Voter Integrity Project, a volunteer organization that has been combing voter rolls looking of possible voter fraud  since just after the November 2012 election.