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Sounds Of Music To Fill Cincinnati For Make Music Day

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Courtesy of Make Music Cincinnati
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The summer solstice is the longest day of the year, perfect for making and celebrating music, according to organizers of this year's Make Music Day on June 21.

"Make Music Day is a free celebration of music all around the world," says Brandon Voorhees, founder of Make Music Cincinnati. "It launched in 1982 in France and is now held ... in more than a thousand cities in over 120 countries."

Free, outdoor events range from concerts of all kinds by professionals and amateurs, to drum circles and sing-a-longs. There are more than 40 venues where events are planned, many in Cincinnati parks, beginning at 11 a.m. and into the evening. (Filter the schedule here.) Voorhees says it's different from a typical music festival because everyone is encouraged to participate.

"You can even get involved in some activities like ukulele lessons or harmonica lessons on Fountain Square," he adds.

Performing groups include Cincinnati Music Accelerator, Cincinnati Boychoir, CCM Preparatory, Young Professionals Choral Collective, Westside Community Band and more local bands.

Voorhees calls music a universal language that speaks to one's whole being and community.

"I think why it's important for Cincinnati is we have a rich musical history that I think sometimes gets overlooked," he says. "This is just another way we can put the city on the map and celebrate our rich history of music."

You'll find a full listing of events here.

WVXU's sister station WGUC's Classics for Kids is a media partner for this event.