Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

A new report from the Ohio Chamber of Commerce says businesses it surveyed in the Buckeye State plan to hire employees despite the uncertainty of economic stability. 

The president of the Ohio Senate doesn’t think lawmakers infringed on cities’ rights with legislation that supersedes local gun ordinances and gives citizens the right to challenge those local laws in court. 

Medical marijuana sales in Ohio continue to increase, even if the product is still available on a very limited basis. 

A federal appeals court has ruled the state can cut federal funding to Planned Parenthood. 

Many local and state government records must be provided, upon request, to the public. When there is a dispute over whether records are public, parties involved participate in a mediation program. Now, a state officeholder wants to expand that program.

When asked by reporters whether it's time for the federal government to hike taxes on gas, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine explains why he thinks that's not a good idea.

Some cities throughout the state have put regulations in place for light weight electric scooters. Now state lawmakers are looking at doing the same thing statewide.

The president of JobsOhio, the state's non-profit job creation company, is paid $621,322. 62 a year. But he's not the only one receiving a hefty paycheck.

More than 5,400 Ohioans have purchased cannabis since sales began at dispensaries in mid-January. 

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) announced Thursday he will not run for president in 2020.

Following an exploratory tour that took him to four early voting states, Ohio Sen. Sherrod announced today that he has decided not to seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. Brown, Ohio's senior U.S. Senator, said he made his decision a couple of days ago. 

In his State of the State speech, Gov. Mike DeWine said he will have a team of cabinet members dedicated to dealing with public health including opioid abuse, mental health services and the health of families. And that idea is getting good reviews right now.

Gov. Mike DeWine used his first State of the State address to emphasize the importance on building towards a better future. He said Ohio can do this by investing in programs that support early childhood development, public health, and workforce development - and by raising the gas tax.

The day before Republican Gov. Mike DeWine delivers his first State of the State speech, a progressive-leaning coalition of health and human service organizations and labor unions says Ohio is falling behind the rest of the nation in some key areas. The One Ohio Now report says the state has not invested enough in schools, health and community safety. 

As of July 1, the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation will no longer pay for a powerful painkiller that’s at the center of the opioid crisis here in the Buckeye State. 

In his campaign for governor last year, Republican Mike DeWine accused his Democratic opponent Richard Cordray of planning to raise taxes. And now, within weeks of taking office, Gov. DeWine is proposing an 18 cent hike in Ohio’s gas tax to pay for road maintenance and construction. 

Last month, Ohio issued food stamp benefits for February to low income Ohioans. The idea was to get needy families the assistance up front so they wouldn’t go hungry due to the federal government shutdown. But now, families are finding it hard to stretch those dollars into March. So the state is making another adjustment.

Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor is calling out a problem in the bail system, saying it’s a real problem when some low-income Ohioans charged with crimes have to pay bail to be released from lockups. 

Last year’s campaign for governor was the most expensive in Ohio history, with the two major party candidates raising more than $43 million. Gov. Mike DeWine loaned his campaign $4 million. He has not forgiven that loan and could now pay himself back from campaign funds.

Gov. Mike DeWine says there won’t be any executions in Ohio in the near future. 

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