Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Referees at sporting events are used to being heckled by fans but, sometimes, they are victims of actual assault. A new bill has been introduced in the Ohio Legislature to address that problem. 

Social media posts from groups in Lancaster have been abuzz for weeks following a child’s performance in a drag queen show at a local bar. Now the state lawmaker who represents that area has introduced a bill that he says will keep that from happening again. 

Ohio lawmakers are debating a plan that would bail out the state’s two aging nuclear energy plants by charging customers more. Gov. Mike DeWine isn’t weighing in on that proposal. But on this "Earth Day," he says nuclear energy needs to be a part of Ohio’s short-term energy landscape.

At the end of last year, former Gov. John Kasich signed a bill into law that bans a surgical procedure most commonly used in second trimester abortions. Now a federal court is blocking part of that new law from going into effect. 

When Gov. Mike DeWine signed the controversial bill into law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, the woman who launched the first version of it in Ohio in 2011 and fought for it until it passed wasn’t there. 

Backers of new federal tax changes promised they would make taxes fairer for everyone. But Statehouse Democrats say that’s not what happened. And the minority party in state government has a tax reform plan of their own.

Ohio’s newest law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is supposed to go into effect in three months. But there’s a very good chance it won’t because there’s a legal challenge looming.

A new report generated from a coalition of farmers, environmentalists, and food pantry organizers says Ohio needs to make changes to its existing policies on food. They say it will create more jobs, reduce hunger and improve the quality of air and water. 

It’s taken eight years and many hours of testimony, but the so-called “Heartbeat Bill” has been signed into law. Gov. Mike DeWine delivered on his campaign promise to sign the controversial legislation that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected. But where does it go from here?

As expected, Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a bill that bans abortions at the point when a fetal heartbeat is detected.

For the third time, a bill that bans abortion from the point a fetal heartbeat is detected has passed the Ohio House and Senate.  But this time will likely be the last for what's been called the "Heartbeat Bill", because Gov. Mike DeWine says he’ll sign it into law. 

Tomorrow, the full Ohio House will vote on a ban on abortion as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. It's been renamed the "Human Rights Protection Act" but has commonly been known as the Heartbeat Bill over the five times lawmakers have considered it.

An Ohio House committee is set to hear a bill tomorrow that would ban elective abortions as early as six weeks of pregnancy. Opponents of that legislation are concerned about changes in what's been known as the "Heartbeat Bill".  

Now that spring is finally here, Ohio’s road crews will be fixing potholes and pavement damaged over the winter. 

An Ohio House committee has received a new version of the so-called Heartbeat Bill, an abortion ban that could happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. And it is raising questions by at least one lawmaker on that committee. 

U.S. Congressman Tim Ryan of the Youngstown area is the latest Democrat to officially throw his hat in the ring to run for the party’s nomination for president in 2020. 

Governor Mike DeWine has created a Minority Health Working Group as part of his strategy to fight opioid abuse. 

Democrats who have long championed a bill that requires companies who do business with Ohio to pay women and men equally have reintroduced that bill. Here's what lawmakers backing the Equal Pay Act are doing this time to get the bill passed.

When Governor Mike DeWine signed the new transportation budget into law, he didn’t veto any elements of it, including a controversial part of it that eliminates the requirement to display a license plate on the front of your car. 

The state’s new transportation budget will do away with the requirement that Ohioans display a license plate on the front of their cars. That might not sound like a big deal to some but it was for some lawmakers who voted to make that change.

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