Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

As preparations continue for the November vote, elections officials are struggling with how to allow safe access for all voters. And part of that strategy involves creating barriers.

Republican House Speaker Larry Householder’s office is reinstituting its work from home policy. This comes after at least one House employee was put on administrative following testing positive for COVID-19. And some Democratic members are furious, saying they’ve been kept in the dark.

Recent vandalism to the Ohio Statehouse and other high- profile government buildings has prompted an outcry from some of the state’s top leaders. Now, Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow the Ohio Attorney General to go after those who damage public buildings.

The leader of Ohio’s Black state lawmakers’ group is the first Ohio legislator known to be diagnosed with COVID-19. Representative Stephanie Howse says she’s experiencing mild symptoms since being diagnosed a couple of days ago.

The COVID19 pandemic has hurt a lot of businesses but not the residential real estate market in Ohio. And there are a couple of factors that are at play here.

Ohio has more of an idea about what this November’s election will look like now that the state’s election chief has handed down a directive outlining details to Ohio’s 88 county boards of elections. 

An extra 20 weeks of unemployment compensation will be made available to eligible Ohioans once they have exhausted their other benefits. 

Many of Ohio’s doctors are already using telehealth to connect to their patients, especially during this pandemic. Now, Planned Parenthood says it is going to do the same thing for some of its services.

Cities throughout Ohio are starting to require people to wear masks or face coverings in public spaces. And Ohioans are working to make sure masks are available to everyone who needs them.

Sales of backyard fireworks are booming, at least partly because the pandemic has canceled public fireworks shows. But it’s still technically illegal to set them off here because a bill has stalled in the Senate.

Ohio’s attorney general thinks consumers might be confused over information they find on Google and other search engines .So, he’s asking Ohioans to share what they think.

During the past couple of weeks, the percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus has increased. And some doctors say they are seeing some other trends.

Pediatrician Rachael Morocco says she’s seeing more  children coming into her practice with COVID like symptoms.

“We’ve also seen an uptick in asymptomatic people who are also testing positive. In particular, we have seen mothers coming in for childbirth who are tested going into the hospital and are positive for no symptoms.”

Ohio gave General Motors some $60 million dollars in state tax credits for its Lordstown operation. Now the attorney general is demanding the company pay the state back.

A new report from a group of business leaders shows many Ohio companies cannot get back on their feet because their employees no longer have affordable day care options. 

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled a Louisiana law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital is an undue burden and unconstitutional. But abortion rights activists say the ruling doesn’t affect a similar law in Ohio.

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a law that allows students in public schools to express their religious beliefs.

Two bills under consideration in the Ohio Legislature would change sentencing for low-level drug crimes to intervention over incarceration. A new study from a liberal leaning think tank shows passing those bills would improve the health of many Ohioans – especially now.

Democrats in the Ohio House say lawmakers need to deal with some important business this summer instead of taking time off. 

Nine dance studios are suing the state of Ohio over mandated shutdowns and limitations imposed on their businesses. 

A bill that would have allowed an extension of benefits to unemployed Ohioans who are at risk or have medical conditions that could be deadly if they contract COVID-19 has been in the works at the Statehouse. But the sponsor of that legislation says it is not necessary now that Gov. Mike DeWine has issued an executive order.

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