Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

The more than 10,000 people in Ohio identified as homeless are already at a higher risk for catching communicable diseases but the coronavirus pandemic is making matters worse. 

The Ohio Democratic Party has dropped its lawsuit over the postponed Election Day. 

There are so many coronavirus patients being treated by medical professionals in New York that makeshift tents have been turned into hospitals. Ohio's leaders say they are planning ahead but aren’t looking to do something similar here.

Ohio’s casinos have been closed for almost two weeks and it's been a week since bars were shut down, including those offering Keno. But Ohio Lottery tickets are still being sold, even under the new “Stay at Home” order that goes into effect tonight.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential procedures. Those facilities are fighting back, saying their services are essential.


Thousands of Ohioans are being laid off as businesses have temporarily shut their doors due to efforts to prevent the spread COVID 19. 

It probably comes as no surprise that unemployment claims in Ohio have skyrocketed this week as businesses continue to temporarily close and lay off workers to try to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

Ohioans who need to renew their driver’s license or tags are going to have to wait. So will people want to get their hair cut or get a tattoo. Those businesses are the latest places ordered to close because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Some Ohio hospitals were already moving to stop elective surgeries, but now those procedures will be put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

When businesses shut down or lay off employees, they are required to give a notice to the feds and the state. A change intended to make that process easier is being made because of the coronavirus pandemic.


Health clubs and entertainment facilities have been ordered to shut down at the close of business Monday because of concerns about the spread of coronavirus. 

Many Ohioans are working from home. And some community meetings are being held online instead of in person due to concerns about coronavirus. But there are some meetings that cannot be held online.

With schools shutting after Monday due to coronavirus concerns, many children who depend on school breakfasts and lunches will not have those options. And many other programs who rely on older volunteers to help meet the needs of older Ohioans will be needing help too. 

Gov. Mike DeWine is closing K-12 schools, banning many large public events and stopping most visits at the state's nursing homes as part of a comprehensive strategy to combat the spread of coronavirus.

Congress is considering a bill that would make it easier for low-income people to get emergency food assistance during the COVID-19 outbreak. And advocates for foodbanks are requesting the state and communities make some changes too.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he thinks the state’s Coronavirus hotline needs to be moved to a larger location because the tight space it is located in now is conducive to passing the potentially deadly disease. The hotline is getting an average of two calls per minute. 

The language for a proposed amendment to legalize marijuana on Ohio’s fall ballot has been rejected. But that’s not unusual.

The American Red Cross says blood supplies are typically low this time of year but the organization fears that situation could get even worse. 

Nearly a dozen people at a nursing home in Washington died from COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. Nursing homes throughout Ohio are being urged to take precautions to prevent coronavirus in their facilities so that doesn’t happen here.  

Former Governor Ted Strickland is officially joining the effort to repeal capital punishment, saying he regrets the way he handled Ohio’s death penalty while he was in office. 

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