Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Two Republican Ohio House members want to introduce a bill soon that would eliminate the prevailing wage on construction projects. And that puts the GOP leader of that chamber in a spot.

A pair of bills in the Ohio Legislature would change the way people register to vote, making it an automated process instead requiring them to fill out forms or go online. People could still opt out of the process in both. But the new bill in the House would do it differently than a Senate proposal.

Weather and tariffs have created some tough conditions for Ohio farmers and agribusinesses. But they can get some relief through a state program that reduces the interest on the debt they incur for their operations. 

A Cincinnati abortion clinic that recently lost the variance it needs to operate thinks the problem is now resolved. 

The Ohio House and Senate have had different approaches and ideas on key pieces of legislation during the past year. And while that’s occasionally caused some tension, the leader of the House says that’s ok.

Cincinnati’s only abortion clinic is in business now but its future is uncertain. It is fighting to keep its doors open. 

Two of the Democrats running for president have not been successful in their attempts to have their names certified to be listed on the March 17 Ohio primary ballot. One of the two has been certified to be a write-in candidate though. 

Some states around Ohio have legalized recreational marijuana. But Ohio’s Governor isn’t embracing that possibility. 

Some Ohioans who oppose the U.S. assassination of senior Iranian military Commander Qasem Soleimani took to the streets in several cities this weekend including this one in Columbus on Saturday.

Democrats are looking to 2020 with optimism. Party leaders say they are seeing signs that areas of Ohio that voted for President Donald Trump in 2016 and Republican statewide leaders in 2018 are ready to vote for Democrats in 2020. And they say they have a plan to make that happen.

Ohioans are paying more to drive to holiday gatherings this year. Gas prices are up when compared with this time last year.

Abortion was a big issue in Ohio in 2019, as it has been for several years.  A strict abortion ban was one of the 21 bills that passed, and more bills are still under consideration. 

When the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve, Ohio’s lowest paid workers will have a special reason to celebrate. 

The Christmas weather has been mostly mild this year but many Ohioans are still getting the chills. Public health leaders say the flu has hit the Buckeye State hard.

If you’ve driven Ohio’s roads lately, you’ve probably noticed the big signs with cheeky sayings directed at drivers. Here's why you are likely to see more of them in the future. 

There has been an increase in the number of deaths on Ohio's roads due to distracted driving. At least 51 more people have died already this year. That's why the Ohio Highway Patrol will be stepping up enforcement efforts on the state’s roads this holiday season.

21 bills were signed into law in Ohio in 2019, including the new $69-billion two-year budget, a controversial energy bill that reduced or eliminated clean energy standards and an abortion bill that was put on hold by a federal court before it could take effect.

The leader of the Ohio House says lawmakers are in a quandary when it comes to the death penalty. 

In the next five years, more than a quarter of Ohioans will be over the age of 60. And that’s a concern for first responders, as they’re more likely than ever to encounter a person with dementia. The symptoms of that condition can be misunderstood.  Now there's a new bill to deal with that. 

Nearly 75,000 Ohioans have registered with the state to receive medical marijuana. Of those, just over 51,000 have actually purchased the product. Those involved with the program propose some changes they say will improve it for everyone.

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