© 2022 Cincinnati Public Radio
purple_waveback6.png
Connecting You to a World of Ideas
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Click here to see the latest school, business and worship closings and delays.

Robot chefs, medical twins and 3D-printed houses are some highlights of CES 2022

A persons wears the iSyncWave EEG brain mapping and LED therapy device at the iMediSync booth during the CES tech show Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022, in Las Vegas.
Joe Buglewicz
/
AP
A persons wears the iSyncWave EEG brain mapping and LED therapy device at the iMediSync booth during the CES tech show Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022, in Las Vegas.

Shortened a day because of COVID-19, the Consumer Electronics Show still managed to thrill thousands who saw the Las Vegas event in-person and virtually January 5-7.

Seventeen industries including AI, 3D printing, NFTs, space technology and vehicle technology put their best products forward for the show billed as “The Most Influential Tech Event in the World.”

Here are some of the highlights:

Eat good food made by a non-human

This robot that can learn how to recreate recipes in a restaurant kitchen.

Sensors are attached to kitchen utensils to analyze recipes. AI just needs 48 hours to learn how to make the food and then can easily reproduce the dish. The robots might come in handy for restaurants who have trouble finding cooks.

It’s already doing business in Seoul.

Your reflection can help you find the best healthcare

How about a medical twin to plan your medical treatment? Dassault is already creating 3D models of complicated manufacturing machines. It now wants people to imagine the benefits in medical care.

Plan your trip to space on an autonomous craft that lands like a plane

The Sierra Space Dream Chaser will begin resupplying the International Space Station this year and envisions itself as an air taxi. It can land anywhere a Boeing 737 can land. This NASA video explains why.

This exoskeleton is great for people who have to stand a long time

The Consumer Technology Association puts on the CES and Spokeswoman Carolyn Posner quickly found one of her favorites: a device you can use standing up that makes it feel like you are sitting down.

“One of the things I got to try and was especially cool was an exoskeleton which allows you to basically sit while standing which sounds a bit counterintuitive but it’s really great for surgeons and medical professionals and food professionals which are on their feet a lot.”

3D printed houses are possible and so is 3D printed food with faster and cheaper printers

A 3D, three-bedroom, two-bath printed house in Long Island sold for $300,000, half the cost of one built the traditional way. NBC says this could be the answer to getting more people housed.

Baby inventions were not in short supply

Want to document what your baby is doing but can’t find your phone? Cubtale sends parents buttons they can install in places where things might happen and then they can press a button if they do. The information is then sent to your phone.

It’s now on to store shelves and back to the lab for others.

“Some of the products are actually already being sold, others really fine tuning so they are using this opportunity to talk to buyers, to talk to companies and refine their prototypes,” says Posner.

With more than 30 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2019 and 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.