The Changing Perception And Reality Of HIV/AIDS Today

Mar 23, 2016

Today there is much better treatment for HIV that can prevent it from progressing to AIDS.
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More than a million people in the United States are living with HIV and one in eight don'’t even know they'’re infected, according to aids.gov. At one time an HIV-positive diagnosis was seen as a death sentence. But thanks to years of research and advances in treatments, someone with HIV today can have a normal lifespan, and life, similar to someone without HIV.

There is, however, still a strong stigma attached to the disease and those with HIV still face discrimination, but perceptions are slowly evolving.

Joining us to discuss the changing reality and perception of HIV/AIDS are University of Cincinnati Infectious Disease Center HIV Certified Practice Nurse, Jan Stockton; the Cincinnati Leader for the National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Rose Todd-Stanford; and Cincinnati Men’'s Chorus 25th Anniversary committee member, Bruce Preston.

For more information on HIV treatment and prevention, click here. The Cincinnati Men's Chorus 25th anniversary show will feature panels from the AIDS quilt, all from local individuals. For more information, click here.