Woodstock Remembered With New PBS Doc; Kid Musicians To Rock Washington Park

Aug 12, 2019

Fifty years ago, roughly 400,000 people sought out peace, love and music in a previously quiet and subdued hamlet in upstate New York. The event would become legendary for its extraordinary lineup of musical acts, and for its statement and purpose during one of the most tumultuous eras in American history.

Fifty years later, the memory of Woodstock lives on, and while most of the images that have previously been seen from the three-day music festival feature the rock stars, a new documentary turns the camera around. The people who created the event, and the hundreds of thousands more who attended, are the focus of Woodstock, a new PBS documentary that is airing as part of the American Experience series. Using previously unseen archival footage, we learn how Woodstock was so close to not happening at all, and also, of the way a previously angry community that felt invaded by hippies, rose to the challenge of aiding their fellow man when the festival ran out of food. 

Closer to home, Mason School of Rock is remembering Woodstock with a concert at Washington Park on Sunday, August 25. Kids who attend the school will perform songs that helped set the tone of the 1969 Woodstock festival.

Joining Cincinnati Edition to talk about the documentary Woodstock is producer Jamila Ephron; and joining the show to talk about the Washington Park concert are School of Rock owner Tim Garry, show director Stephen Kuffner, and student performers Cathy Black and Logan Flum.

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