Focus On Technology

Mondays at 6:44 a.m.; 8:44 a.m. during Morning Edition and 4:44 p.m. during All Things Considered

Ann Thompson reports on the latest trends in technology and their effects on medicine, safety, the environment or entertainment.

University of Cincinnati

A Phase 2 clinical trial is getting underway at UC and nearly 20 other sites across the U.S. to determine the safety and efficacy of the drug razuprotafib in treating COVID-19 patients. Researchers say this drug could possibly prevent "long-haulers syndrome."

Courtesy of Control Bionics

An international company with offices in Milford is expanding the ways it can help people with ALS and cerebral palsy communicate.

Courtesy of Tengai Unbiased

Video job interviews are becoming the norm, especially during COVID-19. But there is some question as to how fairly you are evaluated in this medium.

Drone Express

A New Jersey high-tech logistics company, with plans to deliver grocery and drug store items to consumers via drone, is testing a unique kind of radar system in Springfield, Ohio, for beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS).

Pixabay

People who are deaf and hearing impaired will soon be able to experience some of the emotion that the hearing public can when listening to music. A Cincinnati student is perfecting the experience with an invention he intends to make free and web-based.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

When President Trump's campaign sent out texts to a million voters last month, red flags went off causing Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile to block them. The carriers, the FCC and the campaign are trying to get it all sorted out so that this peer-to-peer messaging can continue. The campaign claims it was not auto-dialing, but it caused some to wonder, what are the rights of cell phone users, companies and campaigns?

B. Hayes / NIST

With 60-70% of your face covered up by a mask, it isn't surprising that facial recognition algorithms designed pre-pandemic aren't working very well. The U.S. government did a study that proves this as companies and security agencies scramble to design new ones.

Pixabay

With an 80% success rate in contact tracing, few can match Northern Kentucky Health Department's lead on notifying and following up with potential COVID-19 targets. 

Ethos Labs

A Newport company has developed what it says is a more accurate test for COVID-19 antibodies. It gives you a percentage of how protected your body is if exposed to the virus again. But even that company - Ethos Laboratories - says nobody knows how long the antibodies last.

Courtesy of U.S. Military

Districts around the country are announcing their back-to-school plans, and in the age of coronavirus, many include remote learning. For some teachers and students, at-home learning didn't go very well this spring after the pandemic forced them to stay at home. How are districts looking to improve, and what can they do differently?

Courtesy of Venti-Now

Brazil, the second worst country in the world for COVID-19 cases, is getting some help from Cincinnati. The new non-profit Venti-Now will send ventilators there for free that it designed, built and tested in just three weeks. Tanzania is also on the list to get them.

clean air coronavirus
Courtesy of Extreme Microbial Technologies

A local sterilization company has seen its business skyrocket during the pandemic. Not only is it serving its regular food-industry customers but new ones like law firms, dentists and hair salons who want to protect against COVID-19.

Pixabay

Politicians and police are continuing to crack down on intellectual property theft in what is costing the U.S. as much as $600 billion a year. But what if you could teach scientists to protect themselves as an added layer of security?

FANUC

Companies around the globe are deciding if they need new business models in the post-COVID-19 era. Some say it goes beyond automation and artificial intelligence.

Courtesy of The Journal Radiology

Pictures of the brain in COVID-19 patients are yielding clues that may help identify the virus sooner.

Courtesy of EagleHawk

Sanitizing large public spaces in the age of the coronavirus is coming down to drones. It may be a way to get fans in the stands sooner. It also could be an effective way to transport a vaccine to the masses once one becomes available. These and other applications have researchers scrambling to find pandemic-era drone applications.

University of Dayton

Possibly one of the first things to go when companies have money problems is the information technology department. Cybersecurity experts don't want that to happen, especially during a pandemic when the practice of employees working from home puts online information at risk.

uc coronavirus testing
Courtesy of Jason Whitman

How do we navigate the unknown as safely as possible? And how do we engage with each other again in public in a way that's safe and science-based? A health metrics expert answered those questions and more in an April discussion sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations.

Courtesy of the Freestore Foodbank

Food for the hungry is now within walking distance for hundreds more Cincinnatians after a team of problem solvers used data analytics to strategically place food distribution centers closer to them.

As millions of Americans get ready to return to work the subject of "healthy buildings" has come up, and Cincinnati facility engineers are explaining what's involved.

Pages