Focus On Technology

Mondays at 6:44 a.m.; 8:44 a.m. during Morning Edition and 4:44 p.m. during All Things Considered

Ann Thompson reports on the latest trends in technology and their effects on medicine, safety, the environment or entertainment.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A new assisted living facility in Blue Ash is helping people better understand memory loss with a simple simulation open to the community.

Courtesy of Procter & Gamble

Visitors to this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas were wowed by Procter & Gamble's beauty and bathroom technology.

Courtesy of Washington State University

It's no secret that road salt is not very sustainable. So, states like Ohio are looking for greener alternatives. It is using so-called "BEET HEET," a de-icer made with the vegetable.  A Washington State University professor is proving grape extract and other agricultural waste can be used. Research shows it melts ice faster and causes significantly less damage to concrete and asphalt than traditional methods.

Courtesy of Patriot One Technolgies

At Great American Ball Park, technology inside a couple of unobtrusive planters use artificial intelligence and magnets to make sure people coming inside don't have weapons or explosive devices. Ginter Electric, a Patriot One Technologies dealer, installed the system and is partnering with the Cincinnati Reds.  Ginter's T. J. Dooley is looking to sign up businesses, governments and schools.

Ann Thompson

Robots may be helping to grow your salad greens. WVXU first told you about 80 Acres Farms when it had a single location in Spring Grove Village. Now it's expanded to Hamilton and is intent on helping others recreate its indoor robotic farming.

Reebok

Waste from the coffee you drank this morning at McDonald's may soon end up in a brand new Lincoln Continental. Reebok's new shoe offering next year is made from plants. These are just two examples of an increasing number of eco-friendly products by companies working toward a circular economy.

Ford

Electric vehicles, equipped with a special manufactured sound at low speeds, are already hitting the car lots. The U.S. government will require the otherwise quiet vehicles to make noise by September 2020, to alert blind, visually impaired and distracted pedestrians.

University of Dayton

The University of Dayton School of Engineering lab may be instrumental in helping airlines reduce their huge carbon footprint - an estimated 43 gigatons of pollution through 2050. That's nearly 5% of the world's remaining carbon budget.

Courtesy of Cincinnati Children's

A serious lung complication for a small group of juvenile arthritis patients is causing concern for both Cincinnati Children's Hospital researchers and the families of patients.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A University of Dayton student and Cincinnati Country Day graduate has come up with a way to make cerebral palsy patients comfortable and safe while they sleep.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Psilocybin, a key ingredient in hallucinogenic magic mushrooms, is time consuming and expensive to make. That could be a problem when producing it as a drug to treat depression and addiction. Miami University researchers have apparently figured out a way to make psychedelic drugs faster and cheaper.

Courtesy of Ohio Department of Transportation

Ohio continues to give the green light to businesses that want to help pioneer the development of self-driving vehicles. Just last week at a COSI conference, Lt. Governor Jon Husted was wooing Toyota, Waymo, Ford, the American Trucking Associations, AAA and others.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

More than a year ago, Shepherd Chemical, a fourth-generation family-owned manufacturer of specialty chemicals, started feeling the heat from China. But after making a few changes that didn't cost anything, it cut its production time by more than half. Now it's selling its products in Asia.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A once rare and potentially deadly condition among pregnant women is becoming more common. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center are trying to pinpoint a cause and develop a treatment.

Steven Depolo / Flickr

At least four Southwest Ohio schools are participating in a program which uses a smart thermometer and an app to track and stop the spread of disease.

provided

Atsuo Sasaki, Ph.D., associate professor at the UC College of Medicine, says there's an FDA-approved drug that can shrink brain and other types of inoperable cancer in animal models by targeting the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells.

AP Photo/Molly Corfman

New research from scientists at Washington University in St. Louis looks at whether nine, 10 and 11 year olds who play team sports are less likely to become depressed.

public domain

Professional and collegiate sports teams have begun to experiment with cryptocurrency. Some have tried it and backed away, while others have strict limits. Some even allow ticket purchases with it.

Courtesy of Tengai

How would you feel about a robot interviewing you for a job? Swedish company Tengai is working on an English version of its robot which it claims will ask you questions without biases. Other companies, like HireVue and Humantic, formerly DeepSense, dig for personality traits based on digital interviews and social media accounts.

Vincent Walter / Purdue University

Purdue University has installed the first all-digital nuclear reactor system in the United States. Scientists say the technology will allow for more data analysis which will make plants safer.

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