eviction

With one of the highest eviction rates in the country, Dayton city leaders set out to do something about it last year with the formation of an Eviction Task Force. This summer, city commissioners passed two task force recommendations and may take further steps.

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Reed Saxon / AP

Hamilton County Clerk of Courts expects evictions will skyrocket as the pandemic continues.

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Jim Nolan / WVXU

Recent days in Cincinnati have brought to our city a series of daily events in which people call for justice following the deaths of black Americans at the hands of police. The protests here mirror the unrest gripping much of the nation.

foreclosure
David Zalubowski / AP

Cincinnati Edition looks at what has been happening with local evictions and foreclosures during the pandemic.

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A Dayton task force will deliver recommendations in the first quarter of 2020 to address the city's high eviction rate, which ranks 26th in the country.

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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati council has passed several pieces of legislation that supporters say will dramatically reduce preventable evictions. The package included three motions, which were all approved by an 8-0 vote.  The five ordinances were approved by 7-1 votes.

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At 9:00 a.m. on any given weekday, tenants are at the Hamilton County Municipal Court in eviction court pleading their case to a magistrate.

eviction
Rachelle Blidner / AP

There are more than 12,000 evictions a year in Hamilton County. That's 34% higher than the national average. Now, the Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati and the Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency have created a program to mitigate the crisis. The goal of the Eviction Prevention Assistance Program is to keep families in their homes.

For many poor families in America, eviction is a real and ongoing threat. Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute.

"Eviction isn't just a condition of poverty; it's a cause of poverty," Desmond says. "Eviction is a direct cause of homelessness, but it also is a cause of residential instability, school instability [and] community instability."